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  1. #11
    seethroughdog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tronds View Post
    No.
    Clear means when the fixer has cleared the milkyness of the film. When the film base looks clear.


    Some agitation in the fixer helps the process, but it will be fxed anyway.

    A fixer mixed two days ago and used for two films is plenty good for at least 7 films more over a period of several months.
    Insufficient time in the fixer is the cause of this problem.

    Fix it again. Overfixing is only possible if you leave the film in the fixer for a day or more, so don't even take that into concideration.


    Trond
    Ok, got it. Will fix it again today.
    Thanks Trond and thank you all!
    Much appreciated

  2. #12
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tronds View Post

    Some agitation in the fixer helps the process, but it will be fxed anyway.

    A fixer mixed two days ago and used for two films is plenty good for at least 7 films more over a period of several months.
    Insufficient time in the fixer is the cause of this problem.

    Fix it again. Overfixing is only possible if you leave the film in the fixer for a day or more, so don't even take that into concideration.


    Trond
    I'll differ slightly with Tronds.

    It is possible that the problem with your negatives is due to insufficient agitation in the fixer.

    Films need agitation in the fixer too.

    FWIW, Kodak recommends frequent agitation in the fixer. Ilford recommends using the same agitation regime in the fixer as one uses in the developer (assuming presumably one doesn't use stand development)..
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    I'll differ slightly with Tronds.

    It is possible that the problem with your negatives is due to insufficient agitation in the fixer.

    Films need agitation in the fixer too.

    FWIW, Kodak recommends frequent agitation in the fixer. Ilford recommends using the same agitation regime in the fixer as one uses in the developer (assuming presumably one doesn't use stand development)..
    The fixer works faster with agitation, but the film will be fixed anyway if you fix it for twice the time to be clear.

  4. #14
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    If you follow the manufacturer's recommendations regarding fixing, it will work. No other advice is needed.

    Test the fixer with a little piece of film before using it. Note how long the clearing time is when the fixer is absolutely freshly mixed and at the correct temperature. If the clearing time becomes much longer than it was initially, the fixer is getting exhausted and needs to be replaced. In my case when the clearing time becomes 2 times as long as when the fixer was fresh, I replace it. Just to be safe. Or I might regret it ten years down the road.

    It looks to me as though your film is underfixed as well. Was your fixer at the correct temperature (around 68*F / 20*C)?
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

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  5. #15
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    Yes, I vote "underfixed" too.

    I always treat every step of the process the same way from start to finish. Pre-rinse, develop, stop, wash and fix are all agitated the same way.
    I know that the steps, post-developer aren't AS CRITICAL as they are in the developer but I still try to do everything the same. That way, if I make a mistake, it will have less of a chance of messing up my film.

    When I go to the shooting range, I use the motto: "Aim small. Miss small."
    In other words, if I aim for the very center of the target, the "X" in the center of the 10-ring, even if I don't hit my mark, I'll still probably get a bull's eye.
    I do the same thing for film. Do everything very carefully and, if I mess up, I still have a chance to get good pictures.
    Randy S.

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  6. #16
    seethroughdog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    It looks to me as though your film is underfixed as well. Was your fixer at the correct temperature (around 68*F / 20*C)?
    Probably not, as it took one hour for the stand development etc.. probably the temperature changed afterwards.
    Is there a way to control this? I mean how do I keep the fixer at the same temp.

  7. #17

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    Set up a water bath in a tray, or dish pan, or whatever you have available. Put the chemical bottles and your developing tank in it. For long processing times like you are using, you will likely need to make adjustments to warm or cool the bath depending on your ambient conditions.
    Once you have the water bath at the right temperature, the adjustments shouldn't need more than a few ounces/ml of water. If it starts getting too full, just remove enough to maintain a convenient level.

  8. #18

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    At this time of year in Nicosia I'd be surprised if the ambient temp is low enough to give you a fix temperature problem unless you are developing in the open air . It will work very successfully at a few degrees below the 20C that the film has to be developed at.

    So what was the temperature of the room where the fix was kept?

    pentaxuser

  9. #19
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    I use a plastic cat box. (Never used by a cat, of course!)
    I take the hose from the faucet and run it into the cat box and let the water run slowly.

    This allows me to keep chems at the proper temp, I always have as much tempered wash water as I want and the water in the box acts as a buffer in case the faucet water changes.
    Randy S.

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  10. #20
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    During the fixing process after some time you can also look what is going on with your films ,Im doing this about 15 years and never going nothing wrong.


    If the fogging is not the result of using exhausted fixer then you must determine the source of the fogging which could be any of the following

    - camera light leak
    - film cannister light lea
    - loading the film into the developing tank in less than total darkness.
    - storage of the film before or after exposure in high temperatures.
    - film will gain base level fog if stored for many years without development


    I never use Kodak Films but I know that they have already basically more gray base than other materials.

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