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  1. #1
    ajmiller's Avatar
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    The PCS Darkroom Formulary - pdf booklet

    I have a 35 page booklet which contains formulae for both colour and black and white processing solutions.
    I'm not sure of the year but the references at the back cite a book from 1982 so it looks like it could be from after that.
    I can't find any copyright on it except to say it was written by 'R.C. Potts M.Sc. and published by Photo Chemical Supplies of Middlesex.'
    If anyone is interested I've scanned a copy and posted it to the link below which is a Dropbox account.
    I'm not sure if there's anything new in it that most of you 'home-brewers' aren't aware of already but here it is:-

    http://dl.dropbox.com/u/18474121/PCS..._Formulary.pdf

    It's just under 3MB and a pdf.

    Any problems downloading let me know.

    Enjoy!

    - Tony
    regards,

    Tony

  2. #2
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quite interesting Tony. Nothing unusual or new but for it's time and even now still a good collection of useful formulae.

    Ian

  3. #3
    Trask's Avatar
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    I had no trouble downloading it. Thanks for making it available.

  4. #4
    delphine's Avatar
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    Thank you for sharing. In the print dev formulaes, is the No 37 the receipe of the PQ developer sold off the shelve?
    I noticed in the film dev section that MQ and PQ was commonly used. What does it stand for?

  5. #5
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
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    delphine ,

    I think they stand for phenidone hydroquinone and metol hydroquinone.

    Umut

  6. #6
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    MQ - Metol Hydroquinone and PQ - Phenidone Hydroquinone.

    ID-62 is a powder version of PQ Universal the commercial form uses Potassium Carbonate and Hydrodie instead of Sodium Carbonate to allow a higher concentratiom of th stock developer. The level of Bromide is increased to 4.5 gm for warmer tones and the Benzotriazole left out (ID-78).

    Ian

  7. #7

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    Thanks.

  8. #8

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    Thanks mate.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mustafa Umut Sarac View Post
    delphine ,

    I think they stand for phenidone hydroquinone and metol hydroquinone.

    Umut
    Correct.

    As an aside the Q is for Quinol, which is the original trade name Kodak used for hydroquinone.

    I'm full of useless facts today.

  10. #10
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    The color formulas are, as usual, close but no cigar! They will give usable images but the images may not be optimum depending on the film.

    PE

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