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  1. #11
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    I also agree with HC-110, but if you would like something that maybe can give one-third of a stop (perhaps) more shadow detail, you might want to try T-max developer.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dean Taylor View Post
    attaining a quality image (this is paramount and supercedes all other considerations)
    If image-quality is more important than everything else, then I suggest Kodak XTOL.
    Of all popular developers out there, XTOL gives the finest grain, as well as nearly the highest speed. The package will produce 5 liters of developer, which I suggest putting in 5 1-liter bottles. That's 20 rolls (assuming 250 ml/roll undiluted), which you shoot in 5-6 months at your rate. After mixing, XTOL lasts for 6 months, which means you won't be discarding unused developer.

    Enjoy!

    Mark Overton

  3. #13
    Dean Taylor's Avatar
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    thank you all for the generous sharing of expertise!

    re: HP5 and HC-110

    Q: generally speaking, what is to be gained by using an 'H' dilution for double the minutes that a 'B' dilution cites?

    That is, what effect does a more dilute soup with longer soak have on the image quality--e.g., more accutance, contrast, etc.?

    Best,

    D.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dean Taylor View Post
    thank you all for the generous sharing of expertise!

    Q: generally speaking, what is to be gained by using an 'H' dilution for double the minutes that what a 'B' dilution cites?

    That is, what effect does a more dilute soup with longer soak have on the image quality?

    Best,

    D.
    It means that I don't have to time it as accurately, to my mind...but mostly because it's easy to mix for the tanks that I have. 1/2 ounce, fill to 16...1 ounce, fill to 32. I'm lazy.

    Edit: Longer wet times can also make the grain more pronounced, so I've heard...but I don't keep the film wet for that long, regardless. I've heard that after 30 minutes, it could be an issue...mine is rarely wet for longer than 20. So I've never checked on it.

  5. #15
    EASmithV's Avatar
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    You can't go wrong with D-76. It's a great re-usable developer, which I find is the most economic way to use Paterson tanks.

    I usually use HC-110 for sheet film since i only need 6oz for my roll tubes.
    www.EASmithV.com

    "The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera."— Dorothea Lange
    http://www.flickr.com/easmithv/
    RIP Kodachrome

  6. #16
    Dean Taylor's Avatar
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    thanks so much for the generous sharing of expertise!

    re: HP5, HC-110

    to continue...

    What is to be gained by using the 'H' dilution for 10 minutes--versus the 'B' for 5 minutes? From what I've read the more dilute soup with a longer stand will have its effects on--what?--accutance? contrast?

    much obliged

    Dean

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