Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,990   Posts: 1,524,133   Online: 1146
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
  1. #1
    Dean Taylor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    33

    35mm b&w processing--which chemicals recommended please?

    My ‘beginner’ question might be augmented by noting:

    Nikon F100, 50mm f/1.8D, Ilford HP5, Plustek scanner…I will be shooting b & w exclusively.

    Q: for someone shooting few rolls of film–say, three or four rolls per month–which chemicals (developer, stop bath, fixer, etc.) would you recommend in the interest of 1) attaining a quality image (this is paramount and supercedes all other considerations) and, 2), minimizes wastage–minimal discarded chemicals owing to aging, etc.?

    also... of the processing protocol, a noted photographer remarked: "I just wipe down the non-emulsion side of the film." question from a newcomer: is that procedure recommended, i.e., wiping just the one side? By the way, do you use cotton gloves when handling the film (b and h has them, as does freestyle)?

    and... In doing my homework before the attempt there seems to be a discrepancy regarding removing the exposed film from the cannister just prior to loading it onto the spool. That is, one procedure suggests drawing the exposed film completely out of the cannister and then spooling it (it seems clumsy, let alone potentially harmful to the film), while the second method, from Ilford, is this one:

    "Take hold of the cassette and your end cap remover and turn out the light. Lever the cap off the cassette, and slide the film spool part way out. Find the film‘s shaped leader, slot this through the light-trap opening, then slide the spool back. This saves having 1.4m/4ft 8in of loose film falling on the floor."

    thank you all!

    Dean Taylor
    Last edited by Dean Taylor; 01-16-2012 at 03:03 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: typo

  2. #2
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,103
    Images
    60
    Developer: Kodak HC110, Ilford Ilfotec HC or other highly concentrated liquid developer
    Stop bath: whatever is easily available to you - it really doesn't seem to go bad, and one diluted has a very light environmental "footprint"
    Fixer: any non-hardening Rapid Fix that is available to you in reasonable quantities - say a one liter package. I'm currently using Ilford Hypam in a 5 liter package, but Ilford Rapid Fixer is available in smaller packages
    Wash-aid: Kodak, Ilford and others - cuts down on water usage
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #3

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Daventry, Northamptonshire, England
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    6,876
    Any fixer or stop bath won't be a problem. At about 32 films per 8 months I doubt if any developer will go bad before you finish it. Even the famous sudden death Xtol in the 5L size will be finished before it dies. It is a very good, versatile and cheap developer and one that may last longer than 8 months anyway in a winebag

    I can't think of any problems at the film rate you quote.

    pentaxuser

  4. #4
    cjbecker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    IN
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    734
    Images
    19
    I use-

    hc110 1-31 straight from bottle

    water stop for roll film

    fp4 fixer

    photoflo

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southern USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,769
    Considering the number of films you propose taking each month I would recommend HC-110.

    Don't use gloves as they interfer with your sense of touch. Wash your hands to remove any oil. Remove the film on the spool completely from the cassette. It is not going to act like a "clock spring" and fly out. Then cut off the leader. Hold the film and spool in one hand using the thumb and last two fingers on each end of the spool. Then using the index finger to guide the film "walk " it onto the developing reel. Practice a few times in the light using a throw away roll of film. It is really quite easy.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 01-16-2012 at 03:29 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    15
    easy to use + long shelf life + little waste + scans well = Diafine
    (not sure about hp5 in diafine, never used hp5, but trix works well; may be others know more about hp5 and diafine)

    stop bath is water, fixer any of the before mentioned

  7. #7
    Dean Taylor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    33
    hello apug community!

    HC-110 it is. And, not to put too fine a point on the matter...

    The Film Developing Cookbook (Anschell/Troop) notes that developers either decrease, increase or maintain the film's rated speed. Which category does HC-110 fall into (I will be shooting Ilford HP5)?

    also... do you subscribe to the 'rolling pin' agitation method--i.e., horizontal on table, rolling back and forth?

    thanks to all!

    Dean Taylor
    Last edited by Dean Taylor; 01-16-2012 at 05:58 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #8
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,103
    Images
    60
    Kodak recommends shooting T-Max 400 at an EI of 320 if you are going to develop it in HC-110 (dil B).

    So it gives a slight decrease for that film.

    I wouldn't use your "rolling pin" method for HC-110 developer or any other developer that gives short developing times - it would be too hard to maintain consistency in your agitation.

    HC-110 is economical enough to render any small amount of "waste" inherent in using inversion agitation unimportant.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  9. #9
    Bruce Osgood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Brooklyn, N.Y. USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,418
    Images
    44
    Firstly, welcome to APUG.

    There are endless answers to your questions and you've got a very good selection to begin your adventure. Once you have settled on your selections, stay with them for as long as you can. Don't change a developer until it tells you: I can't deliver what you want. Then you know better what you are looking for in a developer. You won't need the pillar-to-post routine so many of us go through.

    As far as rolling, you probably won't encounter the situation unless you plan to develop 6 or more rolls at a time. You will probably need a single or double roll stainless steel tank to develop 1 or 2 rolls with inversion agitation.
    Last edited by Bruce Osgood; 01-16-2012 at 05:48 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    North Carolina
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    210
    I use HC-110 all the time. It keeps forever. Use the 1:31 dilution...1/2 ounce in the graduate, then fill to 16 ounces for a small tank. Simple.

    I use Kodak's stop bath, but you can use whatever stop bath you like. Doesn't make much difference. The concentrate lasts forever (sort of like HC-110)

    I use Sprint's Record fixer. Great stuff. Also...lasts forever. I use a hardener with it.

    PhotoFlo is essential for clean negatives. After I wash the reels, I have a spare pitcher of PhotoFlo-ed water by the side...my method is this:
    1. Dump the last wash water out of the tank.
    2. Pour the tank full of PhotoFlo water.
    3. Gently agitate the tank...just swish the water around. After one minute of swishing, discard the water.
    4. Repeat Step 3.
    5. Unroll the negatives from the reel directly into the pitcher...let the roll form a loose "tangle." Then pull the negatives out of the pitcher, squeegee-ing between CLEAN fingers as you go. Re-squeegee them a second time hanging in the air, and then pin them to dry. Presto...water-spot-free negatives!

    Also, I'll second Diafine...great stuff and it lasts forever once mixed. However, it can adjust your film's effective speed. Be mindful. Diafine is great because it's not time or temp-dependent...but then again, I don't watch HC-110 very closely either.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin