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  1. #1
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Processing 8x10 film in a Beseler drum

    I want to start processing sheet film in a Beseler 8x10 drum. I remember when I did the old EP2 process, it required 1 1/2 ounces of chemistry for the drum. What's the required amount of chemistry for 8x10 BW film processing? Also, what time adjustment I have to consider when the film is constantly being agitated? Which is better, one direction or back and forth? Any input will be appreciated.

  2. #2

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    Well you only need 75ml of RA4 colour dev for a print, but ..... See what the developer instructions say, D76 is 250ml(not 150ml) if I remember correctly(I didn't). I have a Simma motor that wobbles the drum sideways and rotates it at something like 30-45 rpm. Never tried film, but works fine for both b&w and colour paper.

    Oops, 250 ml per 8x10, see http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...bs/j78/j78.pdf
    Last edited by Bob-D659; 01-19-2012 at 03:52 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Bob

  3. #3
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Hi Bob. I think you're right. 250mls is about 8 fluid ounces. An 8x10 sheet of film has about the same number of sq inches as a 36 exposure roll of film. Most 35mm film require about 250mls of chemistry per roll. But I still need to know how much less time I need to process film with constant agitation.
    Thanks for your help!

  4. #4
    SMBooth's Avatar
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    I use 300ml (3ml Rodinal, 1:100) in my Unicolor drum which I think is much the same, it goes on a sinusoidal simma base. You need a certain about of developer per sheet, what developer you using? That will determine how much water you need. Most note seem to say reduce development time by 15%, but test for your own process

  5. #5

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    Good Afternoon, Mainecoonmaniac,

    Since the chemical cost is nominal for B & W, I agree with using at least eight ounces. Normally, I use ten or twelve ounces for four sheets of 4 x 5, probably a good deal more than necessary. Using much more than that in my Chromega drum can lead to some spillage if the drum is tilted a bit when I reverse it every thirty seconds. A good starting point for time is whatever is recommended by the manufacturer for continuous agitation processing.

    Konical

  6. #6
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    I use 250ml of chemistry (+ or -) in Cibachrome 8x10 drums for single sheets of 8x10 film. (I don't use much more than this because the fluid will start seeping from the drain holes in the bottom of the drum.) I use a motor base that reverses, but before that I would pick the drum up and turn it around once per minute when using a base that rotated in one direction only. My starting point for development times due to constant agitation is usually 15% less than recommended for small tanks.

    Just be sure to fix the negative in a tray after you've fixed it in the drum to ensure that all of the anti-halation dyes wash out before final rinse. There is not much fluid exchange along the back side of the negative that is plastered to the wall of the drum during processing.

    Jonathan

  7. #7
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Hey thanks for the tip. There seems to be a consensus that there should be a 15% reduction in time and I'll fix the film in another tray after fixing it in the drum. I knew APUGers would have the answer

  8. #8
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Hi John. It sounds like you have very high standards. I'm just going to have to do some testing. Processing with drums a way to go since I don't require a lot of chemistry compared to Kodak hard rubber tanks. And I get to process film in room light. Curently, I use a Yankee Agitank for my 4x5 film and it works well.

  9. #9
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Hey thanks for the heads up. I'll look for one of plug-in variable frequency drives. Are they expensive?

  10. #10

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    Good Evening, Mainecooniac,

    After using rotary processing for about thirty years and experiencing virtually no problems with it, I can offer nothing based on scientific measurement or experimentation, but from the extensive experience, I can suggest the following in response the last Jonnielvis post:

    1--My Beseler motor base (it's nonreversible with only one constant speed) rotates my Chromega drum at a rate of about 20 RPM, which I would guess is considered fairly fast; I haven't used any other motor base so I can't make any comparisons. I do a manual reversal after the first minute and every thirty seconds thereafter. I have never seen any failure to remove the anti-halation backings from film. I do only 4 x 5 film and have the ribs and the spacer in place to keep sheets secure; perhaps this helps randomize the circulation during processing.
    2--I always use a water pre-soak for about 2 minutes; most of the anti-halation coating seems to be disolved during this step, judging by the color of the disposed water.
    3--As I noted in my first response above, I'm generous with my solution amounts, but I'm sure that the film is above the solutions at least as much as it is below them. I can't see that this is any problem, since enough solution remains on the film surface to continue acting throughout the rotation.
    4--I haven't used the Beseler drum; perhaps there's something about it which causes difficulties my Chromega does not.
    5--My film has been predominantly Kodak, but results with occasional use of others (Foma, J & C, a little Ilford) have been just as satisfactory as with Kodak.

    I confess that I am at a loss to explain the problems Johnielvis has cited, but I doubt that the drum rotation speed is likely to be a significant factor.

    Konical

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