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  1. #11

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    From what I recall reading, it might be good for handling high contrast scenes. I also think one of the moderators, SuzanneR, used to use it- you might try sending her a PM.

  2. #12
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    I used a few pro packs of Tri-X 320, and I didn't see too much that made it particularly distinctive compared to other films.

    The suggestion to just shoot what you normally shoot with other films, and processing the first roll according to Kodak's instructions, is logical and a good one.
    Adjust contrast in the resulting negs with development time to suit how you print.

    Have fun!
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    ...it has a slightly longer toe than other films and a more "classic" s-shaped curve...
    The curve shape of 320TXP is not s-shaped. Instead, it continuously rises. It's been described as "all toe."

    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...4017/f4017.pdf

    I just filled a freezer with it in 5x7 and 8x10. This film lends "sparkle" to the whites that's just as valuable with landscapes for me as it is for others in studio situations.

  4. #14

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    I look at the entire curve up to the shoulder when I describe its shape. Agreed it is "all-toe" to a point, where the shoulder is more abrupt than that of a more straight-lined film. The H&D curves in these tech pubs rarely tell the whole story.

  5. #15
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    Its a wonderful film with great bright tones. You do have to be careful to make sure you expose and develop correctly though. Its a little less forgiving than some other films, and can blockup the highlights if you overdo it with the development. Get it right, and you will be amazed at the details in the highlights.
    Please check out my website www.amoxomphotography.com and APUG Portfolio .....

  6. #16
    Brian C. Miller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trask View Post
    I've never used this film before and, given that it's no longer made...
    Whoa! From Kodak: "The world's best selling black-and-white film."

    It's Plus-X that's been discontinued, although there's plenty to be purchased right now. When Kodak discontinues Tri-X, there shall be no more Kodak. (Kodak has discontinued packaging Tri-X in 8x10, but that can still be had in that size, too.)

    This is a general-purpose film. Load it up, shoots lots, and enjoy. Yeah, the curves can vary with the developer that's used, but if Tri-X were as bad as some make it out to be, then it would have flopped a long time ago. Shoot it, use your favorite developer or send it to a lab, and enjoy the prints.

  7. #17
    tomalophicon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian C. Miller View Post
    Whoa! From Kodak: "The world's best selling black-and-white film."

    It's Plus-X that's been discontinued, although there's plenty to be purchased right now. When Kodak discontinues Tri-X, there shall be no more Kodak. (Kodak has discontinued packaging Tri-X in 8x10, but that can still be had in that size, too.)

    This is a general-purpose film. Load it up, shoots lots, and enjoy. Yeah, the curves can vary with the developer that's used, but if Tri-X were as bad as some make it out to be, then it would have flopped a long time ago. Shoot it, use your favorite developer or send it to a lab, and enjoy the prints.
    \

    I'm sure Tri-X 400 is still going, but 320 has gone as far as I know in everything but sheet film.

  8. #18
    Guillaume Zuili's Avatar
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    D76 dil.1+1 Time 10.30 is safe start. Then you can play with as many combo you can imagine.
    For years TXP320 was the only film sold in France in 120 and in Pack.
    TX400 (120) when available was only sold in single and very few photog used it in comparaison.
    Magazines, Kodak, agencies used to give loads of these TXP320 packs.
    Good old time :-(
    And it was used in any situation.
    Studio, landscape, reportage... anything.
    Fantastic film.

  9. #19
    daleeman's Avatar
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    I use tx320 in 4x5 and found it works very well with skin tones with studio flash and continuous lighting from compact florescent bulbs, daylight balanced. It seemed to work well with all tones of skins, even almost Geisha White colored skin.. I found it nice and easy to use in Diafine.

    I stocked up the day Kodak went into bankruptcy, just to protect the flow of sheet film.

    Never used in in 120 format,wish I had.

    Lee

  10. #20

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    Older editions of Kodak Data Book F-5 Negative Making with Kodak Black-and-White Sheet Films has a good discussion of "The Portrait Negative". (Mine is from 1966.) This is about making shots with medium to low-key lighting, where you want good tone separation in the highlights. This is the sort of negative you should be "able to read a newspaper through". There used to be a bunch of films with "upswept" (no shoulder) HD curves, such as LS Pan, Royal Pan (not Royal-X), Tri-X sheet film, Plus-X sheet film, Portrait Panchromatic, Tri-X Ortho, and Super Speed Ortho Portrait. The last of these is 320TXP in sheet film.

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