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  1. #1
    Trask's Avatar
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    Tri-X 320 -- suitable use?

    I've picked up a pro-pack of 5 rolls of 120 Tri-X 320 recently. I've never used this film before and, given that it's no longer made, I'm reluctant to shoot several rolls to try to determine what kind of lighting and subjects this film is best suited for. I understand it's excellent for people photography, and that it separates tones well in Zones 7, 8, etc.

    So how do you suggest I use this film, and what developer(s) should I consider?

    I appreciate any and all advice.

  2. #2
    cjbecker's Avatar
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    I shoot it in 4x5 and it’s my favorite film ever. I shoot it at 200 and develop in hc-110 b (1 to 31) for 6:30.

    I have only used it for portraits but that is mostly what I do.

  3. #3
    wildbill's Avatar
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    how many different answers do you think you're going to get here?
    Shoot whatever you normally shoot and process it in what you normally use for a 200/400 speed film. tmax, pyro, acufine, d-76, rodinal.
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  4. #4
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Just follow Kodak's directions.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  5. #5
    tomalophicon's Avatar
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    I rate it at E.I 32 and soup it in undiluted ID-11 for 40 minutes agitating every 1 second.

  6. #6
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomalophicon View Post
    I rate it at E.I 32 and soup it in undiluted ID-11 for 40 minutes agitating every 1 second.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  7. #7
    Rick A's Avatar
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    WOW, those negs must be lead bricks at EI 32.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  8. #8

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    Why all the sarcastic, unhelpful replies to an honest question?

  9. #9

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    Trask, sorry people are being smartasses. I think what you're seeing here is a general fatigue regarding this type of question. All these threads about which film to use for what, and which developer to use with it, end up with pages of different responses based on personal preferences, and the only thing we can every conclude is there are very few wrong answers, or bad combinations.

    Tri-X 320, like most current films, is flexible enough to be used for nearly any application. It has traditionally been favoured by people doing studio work (ie low flare conditions) because it has a slightly longer toe than other films and a more "classic" s-shaped curve. It is also useful in the studio because it is designed to be retouched if required (the base side of the film has a somewhat matt finish compared to most other films). But it can be used just as well for landscapes and general photography, so you can pretty much do whatever you want with it.

    Regarding developers, again, this is a typical modern film with lots of flexibility. As long as you practice, you can use most any developer with it. Since Tri-X 320 is not as fine grained as slower films, you might want to start by using a standard general purpose fine grain developer and go from there. Developers of this type include XTOL, D76/ID11, and many others. Typically, using these developers diluted 1+1 with water gives a good balance of grain sharpness, tonal balance and film speed, so you can start making pictures without too much testing fuss. I'd suggest D76 at a 1+1 dilution to start. Following Kodak's directions, and then alter things as you see fit based on your results. Hopefully the film is still good though. Depends how old it is and how it was stored.

  10. #10

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    Australian humour is hard to understand sometimes!

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