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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chaska
    jnanian, What dilution/times are you using with Ansco 130 for film? I just started using it for paper and love it. Would love to cut down on the number of soups I have hanging around.
    hi chaska

    i have been using it @ 70º 1:5 ( sometimes a little more sometimes a little less depending on age ) for about 8 minutes or so. i usually develop by inspection ( dark green safelight to peek at how the film looks ) so my times may not be totally exact. you might experiment a little bit and see what works for you ( if it works at all ... )

    tom hoskinson has used it 1:20 with good results too.
    http://www.apug.org/forums/showthrea...9&page=6&pp=10

  2. #12

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    I have standardized my proof exposures for different formats and film types (I use the minimum exposure necessary to get maximum black through clear film). I made a sheet of all the details: enlarger height, lens, f-stop, film type, and exposure time. That sheet is posted on the wall so anyone (I have students) can get a good proof sheet first time, and I don't have to mess around or try to remember each time I need to proof.

    I have another sheet that lists the steps, dilutions, and times for developing negatives in the different developers I have (PMK, HC-110, Clayton F76-Plus) so I can always have that information available.

    I have another sheet that lists dry-down percentages for paper, coming out of my tests published in the current View Camera magazine. Now that I'm using the "leftovers" from all my paper/developer tests, that table comes in really handy.

    I put them all on my computer so that when I print them they're nice looking, and if anything changes, I don't have to start completely from scratch.

  3. #13
    FrankB's Avatar
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    I have a similar approach to contact proof prints as BBarlow. I find my F80's matrix meter is capable of producing very consistent negs so the same settings work for each. Also I use clear plastic neg sleeves (Calumet) to store my negs. When I need a proof I put the negs in the sleeve on top of the paper, wipe it down with my hand and then expose. The results aren't perfect but they're good enough for me and much, much quicker than using a proofing frame.

    I use a sports stopwatch in place of a process timer. All the functionality of a process timer (and more) for half the price, and a neck cord so you don't drop it in the soup.

    I use Foto Timer for the Palm OS for film process timing and it has made life an awful lot easier. Freeware program, highly recommended.

    Invest in one or more darkroom safes, or build a darkdrawer (plans courtesy Tim Rudman's Master Printer book); much quicker than getting each sheet out of the box.

    More coming as and when I remember them...

  4. #14

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    Invest in one of those darkroom flashlights, or a gel to cover a flashlight, their really damned handy. I dropped a neg once and was able to find it quickly because I had my handy dandy flashlight.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by mark
    Invest in one of those darkroom flashlights, or a gel to cover a flashlight, their really damned handy. I dropped a neg once and was able to find it quickly because I had my handy dandy flashlight.
    Mark my version of this is I stretched a red balloon (after I cut-off the blow end) over the front of a torch / flashlight for those just incase moments on the floor. I've found it works a treat.
    Last edited by TPPhotog; 11-07-2004 at 04:43 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #16
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    Tip #1:

    Don't put all of your money in stocks.



    I'm to green to be handing out sage advise on photography to the likes of everyone here...please, just keep posting and talking about what you do and how you do it (photographs, that is). I've learned more here in a few months, than I have in 20 years of trial and error...Thanks all.

  7. #17

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    #1. I have a bunch of small bottles that hold a little over 200mL (although I use the brown glass chem bottles 'cause I get them free from work, the SunnyDelight bottles from the grocery store are perfect). When I mix up a liter of film developer I divvy it evenly into 5 bottles. I top them off COMPLETELY full with water & cap them. When I want to develop film, I pour 1 bottle in the graduated cylinder & add water to make 400 mL > perfect 1:1 without thinking. For 120 film, I use one little bottle per roll of film. This way I don't worry about keeping track of how old the developer is (unless I forget about the darkroom for 6 or 12 months).

    #B. I bought a roll of Ilford MGIV RC paper, 5" wide by nearly 500 feet long for $22 on that auction site. I cut 50 or so 4x5's at a time and put them in a paper safe labelled "4x5" (creative label huh?). I print EVERY negative to a 4x5, using a standard enlarger height / f stop / exposure time. This gives me a pretty good idea of what the negative is capable of without having to squint. Takes a little more time, but I expose a bunch at once and batch develop them. Each set of negatives is put in a sleeve (I cut my 6x7 negatives into "twos") and I write a date/sequence code on the edge. Each proof is labelled the same plus the exposure #.

    This roll of CHEAP paper also makes test prints very easy. I don't even think about the cost of the paper. I have also made a couple of 5x about 12" that look rather nice. I am pretty sure the paper is several years old, but it works perfectly for proofs.

    #3. Music in the darkroom.

  8. #18

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    Boy that sure reads stupid, as if 1:1 takes much thought...... sorry

  9. #19
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    1. Don't leave your 4x5 Fuji color QuickLoads in the fridge when you leave on a long trip. Finding the stuff on the road is a bear.

    2. Don't forget to check your checklist.

    3. After focusing your view camera, close the lens while you're still looking at the ground glass.

    and finally,

    4. Don't drink the Rodinal!
    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

  10. #20
    BWGirl's Avatar
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    Dang, Ralph....you're no fun!
    Jeanette
    .................................................. ................
    Isaiah 25:1

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