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  1. #1

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    How can I create craquelure on the film surface?

    A couple of years ago I read a tutorial on some site (regret not bookmarking it) that somehow created a pattern of cracks on the emulsion. It involved something like a thermal shock with frozen/boiled water and some chemical. I really liked the results but forgot about it since I didn't have access to a darkroom. Now, does anyone know what I'm talking about? I'd like to try and print such an effect in the darkroom. Also, if it's possible to create the effect with household chemicals, I'd appreciate it.

    I searched 'film craquelure' and variants on google to no effect [bad pan - i know ].

    Thanks.
    Last edited by thanos; 01-24-2012 at 12:47 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: syntax

  2. #2
    Barry S's Avatar
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    It sounds like you want to try to create film reticulation. You need to start with an old formulation film like Fomapan or Efke and develop, stop, and fix (no hardener) as normal. Then you thermal shock the film by plunging it into very cold water--and the soft emulsion shrinks and cracks.

  3. #3

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    Try looking for "reticulation." The film is not cracked, but forms a pattern of crack-like ridges in the emulsion. The not-so-secret is to develop your film normally and then dip it into alternate cold and hot water baths. This alternately shrinks and swells the emulsion leaving the worm-like pattern of ridges. I find it's fairly easy to do accidentally, especially when using an emulsion hardening developer like PMK. I've accidentally reticulated Tri-X sheet film developed in PMK on a couple of occasions just by having poor temperature controls in processing.

    Peter Gomena

  4. #4
    bobwysiwyg's Avatar
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    It's called reticulation. See..

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum40/5...iculation.html

    Normally to be avoided, but as you say, can create a pleasing affect sometimes.
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

    Portfolio-http://apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=25518

  5. #5

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    you could always coat your film with water-glass ( sodium silicate ) and roll a brayer or something else over it,
    or bend it &c.

  6. #6

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    Yes. Yes. That's exactly what i'm looking for. Thank you everyone!
    My portfolio (film mostly):
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/tsts/

  7. #7
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
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    You might want to do this on dupes, as this process is quite random.

    Another option to get a crackle effect is to enlarge the image though a crackled glass plane or crumbled cello that is flat on top of the photopaper.

  8. #8

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    if you find silicate,
    it washes off with warm water ..
    ( so it isn't permanent )

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Newt_on_Swings View Post
    You might want to do this on dupes, as this process is quite random.

    Another option to get a crackle effect is to enlarge the image though a crackled glass plane or crumbled cello that is flat on top of the photopaper.
    Interesting. I'll try this too. Thanks
    My portfolio (film mostly):
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/tsts/

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    if you find silicate,
    it washes off with warm water ..
    ( so it isn't permanent )
    Actually I don't know what is silicate and what to do with it.
    My portfolio (film mostly):
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/tsts/

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