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  1. #1

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    HCC-110 with Fujifilm Neopan 400

    I know this has been asked but usually the thread devolves into Rodinal, Xtol and some other brand. I've used HCC-110 for HP5+ and it looks okay but when I tried it with Neopan 400 at 5 minutes with Dilution B, it looks like total crap (and this was after I developed 8 rolls with ). Contrast is wildy out of control and the sharpness looks bad along with shadow details.

    Though it could be due to my scanner when I prescan to get a feel what the negs would look if I printed them.

    Here is a run down of what I used and done

    1. Development using HCC-110 at Dilution B (1:7) at 5 minutes 20 celcius
    2. Stop bath with distilled vinegar at 1:9 for one minutes at 20 celcius (cannot find any stop bath indicator here so I improvided)
    3. Ilford rapid fixer at 1:4 for 5 minutes as well, all same temp.

    Am I doing something wrong? The negs come out looking rather thick. I have heaps of this film which I managed to buy cheap (because they were on sale and no where near their expiry date yet). I only have HCC-110 for now since I first tried it with my HP5+ and Pan F which works well but I've seen some incredible results by other people with neopan and thought I give it a go...
    Last edited by dreamingartemis; 02-08-2012 at 03:04 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #2

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    HC110 and Neopan 400 is my regular B&W set up.

    I develop using dilution H (1:63) for 15 minutes and that gives me a quite dense neg that I then print hard.

    I get my dilution info from this page and it says dilution B is 1:31 not 1:7 as you say. How are you mixing up? One shot? Are you using the 'Euro' version?
    Steve.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by perkeleellinen View Post
    HC110 and Neopan 400 is my regular B&W set up.

    I develop using dilution H (1:63) for 15 minutes and that gives me a quite dense neg that I then print hard.

    I get my dilution info from this page and it says dilution B is 1:31 not 1:7 as you say. How are you mixing up? One shot? Are you using the 'Euro' version?
    I don't think Im using the US version or the Euro version since it's 1:7 for dilution B base on the label for the bottle. According to the kodak pdf here http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...bs/j24/j24.pdf , it seems I'm using the stock solution (on the first table on page 2 where dilution b is ratio 1:7, this is as the same as the ratio listed on the plastic bottle). So I'm not sure what dilution H would be for me but I do know that Dilution B for you and Dilution B for my version works the same because the concentrate for my version is either weaker or stronger.

  4. #4

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    H is double Dilution B. In your case it would be 1:14 or so.

  5. #5

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    Aha, so you made a 'stock' solution and from that diluted it down to make a 'working' solution?

    Can I encourage you to make a one-shot solution and try that and see if you have more luck? Get a syringe and make up a 1:31 solution as indicated in the link above. Try it and see.
    Steve.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by NB23 View Post
    H is double Dilution B. In your case it would be 1:14 or so.
    Okay, I'll give it another go, should have noted something was wrong when the negs game out so thick but then I don't think I should judge a neg by it's thickness (lame joke...)

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by perkeleellinen View Post
    Aha, so you made a 'stock' solution and from that diluted it down to make a 'working' solution?

    Can I encourage you to make a one-shot solution and try that and see if you have more luck? Get a syringe and make up a 1:31 solution as indicated in the link above. Try it and see.
    I'm not sure what you mean because I just bought the bottle from the shop in Singapore (I'm in Malaysia) and it was already like that with all the labels and etc. I'm assuming the factory or supplier mixed it up to stock solution then sold it to us. Which is kinda a rip off if that is indeed the case

  8. #8

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    Oh, that's odd. So you've got an already mixed up stock version of HC110? I'm going to have to let more experienced HC110 users advise on the best way forward.
    Steve.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by perkeleellinen View Post
    Oh, that's odd. So you've got an already mixed up stock version of HC110? I'm going to have to let more experienced HC110 users advise on the best way forward.
    Thanks but I think looking from that website, I need to find some way to double my development time. I'll follow NB23's advice and just simply double up dilution B for ten minutes.

  10. #10

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    Let us know how you get on.

    Just to clarify, my version (US) is very thick like syrup or runny honey. It's sticky and difficult to get off stuff it touches. Is your version like that or more liquid?
    Steve.

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