Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,300   Posts: 1,535,826   Online: 789
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 24
  1. #11
    keithwms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, Virginia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,079
    Blog Entries
    20
    Images
    129
    Yikes, that's bad Eddie! I've never seen anything of the sort, although I tend to use slavich papers and I rarely do ten at a time. There's probably a lot of variation between papers...
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Central Florida, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,920
    Um....

    If you take some negatives and print a few but not develop until later, how would you know you have the right exposure? Unless you are working with negs you have everything already down pat already, it doesn't seem to be a workable solution....

    In addition, shared environment like school darkrooms, there are enough variance even with the same enlarger that is not under your personal control. I would think you run the great risk of wasting lots of paper....

    I would expose - develop - and fix, then quick wash. Then come back and do a full wash later (in the same day).
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  3. #13
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    22,972
    Images
    65
    There are two ways to approach this.

    1. Expose and process immediately. There is no LIK.

    2. Expose and hold a set period of time such as 1 or 2 hours, then process. LIK has moved the exposure but it is probably pretty stable by this time, at least enough for this type of work. With big batches of paper, we used this method at EK.

    1 and 2 will generally give different results.

    and 3. Expose and freeze or expose and keep for 1 - 2 hours then freeze. These will keep almost forever. This is how Kodak makes test strips or standard exposures.

    PE

  4. #14
    eddie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,414
    Images
    207
    I think the OP needs to test before making this part of his workflow. I'd probably expose 5 sheets. I'd immediately develop the first, before exposing the other 4 sheets. Then, I'd wait 1 hour, 2 hours, 24 hours, and 72 hours (to account for no darkroom access during a weekend). The only way to know is to see what happens.

    It seems that the specific paper may play a part, too.

  5. #15
    EKDobbs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    NC
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    124
    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    Um....


    In addition, shared environment like school darkrooms, there are enough variance even with the same enlarger that is not under your personal control. I would think you run the great risk of wasting lots of paper....
    It's not a shared environment. I took a free class period to set up my own darkroom in the of a very large closet in the graphic arts department. No one but me ever touches anything.

    And yes, I plan to work with negatives that I've already got pinned down in terms of exposure time.
    In other worlds he has
    darker days, blacker swells.
    Strokes that mix noir revenge
    on waves of grey.

  6. #16
    EKDobbs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    NC
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    124
    Quote Originally Posted by eddie View Post
    I think the OP needs to test before making this part of his workflow. I'd probably expose 5 sheets. I'd immediately develop the first, before exposing the other 4 sheets. Then, I'd wait 1 hour, 2 hours, 24 hours, and 72 hours (to account for no darkroom access during a weekend). The only way to know is to see what happens.

    It seems that the specific paper may play a part, too.
    I'm very new to printing and the process in general; a little bit of environmental error in the prints is probably indistinguishable to me from my own mistakes in processing. I just wanted to make sure the prints wouldn't completely fog up or lose the image while waiting to be developed.
    In other worlds he has
    darker days, blacker swells.
    Strokes that mix noir revenge
    on waves of grey.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Cincinnati Ohio USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    669

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    125
    "This experience was with the Ilford papers"

    Interesting! To save time I do my contact-sheets (on Ilford RC paper) in bulk (I expose 25-30 sheets then I process them 5 by 5). I only do the "expose and process immediately" procedure at the very beginning of the printing session (to check the exposure time and the chemistry).


    I realized that the bulk of my sheets was never as good as these very 1st tests. Now I know why? Don't delay!

  9. #19
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,232
    Images
    20
    In response to the original question, I don't think a few hours is going to be a problem.

    In response to the situation of a difference in a stack of ten prints, I don't think that's a latent-image keeping issue. Much more likely is change in developer chemistry with each print (Adams suggests factorial development as a solution to this), or variation in the brightness of the enlarger bulb from the first print to the last, particularly if you're using cold light without a compensating timer and/or other methods of keeping the illumination even (bulb heater, properly warmed up, or leaving the bulb on to warm up and controlling exposure with a black card or shutter).
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  10. #20
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    22,972
    Images
    65
    David;

    It could be either, but in some cases it is actually LIK.

    PE

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin