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  1. #1
    EKDobbs's Avatar
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    How long after exp. can print last without dev?

    So, I've got a weird situation. I have a darkroom at school, but I can only be there during school hours. I have a free period, but that's only an hour and a half. What I'd like to be able to do is expose prints during lunch, then process them in my free period about two hours later. The paper will of course be stored in total darkness until it's processed. Even still, will waiting this long degrade the image?
    In other worlds he has
    darker days, blacker swells.
    Strokes that mix noir revenge
    on waves of grey.

  2. #2

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    It will work. It is sort of like shooting film today and developing the roll 2 weeks later. However paper is a little more sensitive. I would not wait 2 weeks to develop it. Actually I would not wait even a full day. I have done this test myself. If expose 2 sheets of paper the same way. Like a 10 second exposure of a negative at F16 and develop one sheet right away and put the other sheet away and develop it a day later in FRESH DEVELOPER the two pints look different. Not bad but different.
    Last edited by brianmquinn; 02-08-2012 at 06:03 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #3
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Days or more should be fine. No problem.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  4. #4

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    Pretty sure I saw something about that on Ilford Photo's website, have a look around there. IIRC, a few hours is ok.
    Bob

  5. #5
    Leigh B's Avatar
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    The latent image on film can remain viable for months, or even years with some degradation (not recommended).

    I've never seen a discussion of the latent image on paper. Since paper chemistry is similar to film, I think several days would be no problem.

    Just make sure you don't use a "developer-incorporated" paper. Otherwise it might start without you. ;-)

    - Leigh
    “Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something.” - Plato

  6. #6
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    The latent image keeping of paper is generally not as good as that of film. Film was designed to last years with little or no change. I have seen paper that changes from first to last print in a group of 10 processed at once after the last sheet was exposed.

    It varies with paper.

    It also can change either speed or contrast or both. I suggest that the only way to know for sure is to test.

    PE

  7. #7
    eddie's Avatar
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    My experience is as PE reports. I've seen changes while bulk processing 5-10 sheets at a time, after the last sheet was exposed. It happened with Ilford MG IV and warmtone fiber papers. I now limit exposure to 3 sheets in succession, before processing. Even with 5-10 sheets, processing began within 10-15 minutes of the first sheet's exposure. I'd be wary of waiting hours, or days.

  8. #8

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    Therefore . . .that short stack of paper I gave a 1/4 stop of preflash to . . .last summer . . .seemed like a good idea at the time.

  9. #9
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    If you are seeing changes over 10-15 minutes when working up a batch of ten prints then perhaps your developer is exhausting. Please also be careful to keep exposed papers in complete darkness after exposure- a typical enlarger has a lot of light leaks, plus the light reflected off the paper can be very substantial, and can easily fog exposed papers lying around.

    Hours should be totally fine.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  10. #10
    eddie's Avatar
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    Keith- I used fresh developer, and exposed paper was kept in a separate paper safe. No chance for inadvertent exposure. This experience was with the Ilford papers. I have successfully bulk processed Forte Poly WT fiber papers without any variations, using the same routine.

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