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  1. #11
    Dshambli's Avatar
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    I see nobody's suggested any hypo clearing solution. That may be something you should add.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dshambli View Post
    I see nobody's suggested any hypo clearing solution. That may be something you should add.
    I'm new to all of this and was planning to use the Ilford method of rinsing after dumping the fixer. Is hypo still necessary?

  3. #13
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    It makes the process a lot faster with hypo.
    - Derek
    [ Insert meaningless camera listing here ]

  4. #14
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    B&W processing FAQ.

    Some suggestions:
    - ditch the dial thermometer (terribly inaccurate) for a $2 digital aquarium thermometer off eBay
    - make sure you have enough reels to fill the tank, prevents a reel riding up the centre column and leaving the developer
    - make sure the tank+reels can be used also with 120 film because you'll probably want to go there sooner or later
    - you don't need stop bath for film, just use a couple changes of water
    - wash aid is nice but again, not required for film
    - Ilford rinse method is OK but be a bit more conservative and go for more like 6 changes of water (5,10,20,20,20,20 inversions)
    - don't buy accordion bottles; they're impossible to wash and still let oxygen through

  5. #15
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by desame.one View Post
    I'm new to all of this and was planning to use the Ilford method of rinsing after dumping the fixer. Is hypo still necessary?
    I expect that you mean "hypo clearing agent" rather than "hypo" - "hypo" is an out of date but still rather prevalent name for traditional fixer.

    Wash Aid is a good, clear generic term that avoids confusion.

    On whether it is necessary or not, there are lots of "discussions" here and elsewhere about this issue. Besides speeding the process, it adds certainty that your wash is complete, and can help you save water.

    FWIW, I prefer to use it.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #16

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    MATT - Thanks for clearing that up. Now I know what HCA stands for.

    polyglot - Awesome FAQ you have linked in your signature. Gonna go back now and continue reading through it.

  7. #17
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    Don't get a plastic tank. Start now with hewes reels and a stainless tank. Trust me you'll thank me later.

    Don't worry about HCA right now. It's not required just starting out nor will it harm things by not using it. But when the time comes opt for bulk sodium sulfite that you mix when necessary.

    Personally I've had zero issues with accordion bottles.

    Also unless you're closer to b&h, consider freestyle photo instead - they're a lot more analog centric.

    Edit: I just read you're in socal - DEFINITELY use freestyle. Were talking less than 1-2 days shipping here as they're also in socal.

    I recommend you stick with d-76 while starting out and use a generic rapid fixer (Arista) from Freestyle.
    Last edited by clayne; 02-13-2012 at 03:19 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by clayne View Post
    Don't get a plastic tank. Start now with hewes reels and a stainless tank. Trust me you'll thank me later.
    I second the hewes reels. B/c nothing will make you want to throw the entire idea out the window more than learning and ruining film on cheap-o reels that even seasoned vets couldn't load.

    A few other things I'd wished I'd been told at the start:

    To get a bigger tank, say one for 6 reels, and then only ever load film on 4 of the reels. Then measure your chems out to only cover the reels w/ film. It will leave room for fluids to really move during inversion and will take care of some of the uneven development problems that are more common when you've a daylight tank that's really full.

    And on that note, also to not pour the developer into the tank w/ film through the cap, but rather to lower the reels into the tank w/ the developer in it. Again, pretty much will solve the majority of problems w/ uneven development you may run into. For this though, you'll need a space you can make dark - wouldn't want to do it in a changing bag. When I started I had a very small closet in the apartment that I could black out. I'd a tiny table in it w/ a tupperware tray to catch spills, standing room only. It was small but made the whole experiences way nicer than sweaty a changing bag.

  9. #19

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    Just a little warning. There will be plenty of people saying plastic reels are unusable, changing bags are impractical and using rotating for agitation will ruin your film. And yet I prefer all three with no apparent issues. So I would suggest you to try different methods and use whatever suits best for you.
    I like my film stirred, not shaken.
    Flickr

  10. #20
    Dshambli's Avatar
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    I second plastic reels. If you go stainless, go with the Hewes reels. They're expensive, but I ruined two rolls with cheap stainless reels. I'd say you have the basics. If you keep taking advice, you're going to get ten people with twelve answers. My advice is get started with what you have and change it later to see what happens. You'll find that all this advice works but you'll find what works best for you.

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