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  1. #21
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Depending on the frequency of your darkroom work, anything battery operated has a tendency to stop working just when you need it. I'd get the dial thermometer. You can get the digital one to calibrate the dial one if you want.

    You might want some smaller graduates to measure out the Ilfosol.

    You will probably need a loupe for examining the negatives. The inexpensive 8x loupes are good for 35mm frames. Like this $6.50 Kalt.

    Some stainless film clips to hold the film while drying would be nice.

    This changing bag has an internal frame that makes it easier to work http://www.freestylephoto.biz/25001-...-Changing-Room

    The file pages come in 6x6 also, so you don't waste a frame.

  2. #22
    Helinophoto's Avatar
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    I use one of these, takes two 35mm films or one 120 film: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...Tank_with.html

    I have developed two films in it -once-, the other times, i put in the reel with film first and use the empty reel to hold the film-loaded one at the bottom of the tank.
    Also, I find it more convenient mixing the chemicals when I only need 600ml of everything, makes for smaller bottles and a tidier work-space.
    - Remember that you can pick up most equipment like this for just about nothing if you check your local used-sale web page/paper and/or yardsales, no real need to parting yourself with a lot of money you can spend on film/chemicals instead =)

    Anyway, good luck and make sure to post your initial results =)
    -
    "Nice picture, you must have an amazing camera."
    Visit my photography blog at: http://helino-photo.blogspot.com

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by GraemeMitchell View Post
    I second the hewes reels. B/c nothing will make you want to throw the entire idea out the window more than learning and ruining film on cheap-o reels that even seasoned vets couldn't load.

    A few other things I'd wished I'd been told at the start:

    To get a bigger tank, say one for 6 reels, and then only ever load film on 4 of the reels. Then measure your chems out to only cover the reels w/ film. It will leave room for fluids to really move during inversion and will take care of some of the uneven development problems that are more common when you've a daylight tank that's really full.

    And on that note, also to not pour the developer into the tank w/ film through the cap, but rather to lower the reels into the tank w/ the developer in it. Again, pretty much will solve the majority of problems w/ uneven development you may run into. For this though, you'll need a space you can make dark - wouldn't want to do it in a changing bag. When I started I had a very small closet in the apartment that I could black out. I'd a tiny table in it w/ a tupperware tray to catch spills, standing room only. It was small but made the whole experiences way nicer than sweaty a changing bag.


    Definitely listen to this advice concerning the measurement of chemicals. I suffered through ruining many rolls before I learned about leaving enough room for the fluids to move during inversion. Crucial.

  4. #24
    fotch's Avatar
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    If your just starting out, you may want to process one roll at a time. Doing quanity only makes sense when you have both the experience and confidence that you have everything under control. JMHO
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  5. #25

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    TIMER!!!

    I think Everyone has missed one of the most important items for film development--- A TIMER!!!!

    Go to the dollar store and get a basic kitchen timer-- I like the ones that have a clip so I can clip them to my shirt front.
    * Just because your eyes are closed, doesn't mean the lights in the darkroom are off. *
    * When the film you put in the camera is worth more than the camera you put the film in... *
    * When I started using 8x10, it amazed me how many shots were close to the car. *

  6. #26
    Helinophoto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Searust View Post
    I think Everyone has missed one of the most important items for film development--- A TIMER!!!!

    Go to the dollar store and get a basic kitchen timer-- I like the ones that have a clip so I can clip them to my shirt front.
    Any mobile phone will do, I use my iPhone =)
    -
    "Nice picture, you must have an amazing camera."
    Visit my photography blog at: http://helino-photo.blogspot.com

  7. #27
    clayne's Avatar
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    As far as the reels/tank go, you only need this: http://www.freestylephoto.biz/94321-...Processing-Kit

    Ditch the Paterson plastic idea. They have issues and you must wait in-between rolls for the plastic to dry. People whine about how they're '"so much easier," but spooling 135 onto Hewes reels is a cake-walk once you get used to it. Even 120/220 isn't the end of the world either.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  8. #28
    Coffeehound's Avatar
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    Where are you going to dry this film? I use the bathroom. Took some nylon cord and stretched from one end of the tub to the other, high enough to hang 36 exposure 35mm or 220 film (don't want anything to touch). Then either some film clips with weights or just some spring clamp type of clothes pins..... Pick one type of film. One type of chemicals. LEARN theses.... The branch out and watch out!
    Welcome to the dark...
    Cameras.
    Nikon F2a (semi-retired), Nikon 28mm, Sigma 500mm f8, Vivitar Series I 70-210 zoom
    2 Nikon N90s one 70 - 300 AF Macro, one 100 - 300 AF)
    Nikon N90 w/ 100 - 300 AF lens, 24-50 AF, 35-70 AF
    Mamiya C220 80mm f2.8, 180mm f4.5, 135mm f4.5, 65mm f6.5

    Three Sony Mavica Digital cameras, and a Fuji FinePix S2800HD I got after the partner died.. HP Photosmart E327
    and some Bushnell Binoculars with digit camera built in.
    Omega Super Chromega C-700 6X7 enlarger with 50mm and 80mm lens

  9. #29

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    Wow! You guys are all awesome! Thank you all for taking the time to share your insight and opinions with me. I truly appreciate your willingness to help a new guy out. I'm looking forward to a lot of enjoyment developing my own film ... and furthering my knowledge in other aspects of the photography process.

    I predict that shooting film will be a very spiritual process for me. Surely I must be correct in some way believing that analog photography is the thinking man's photography.

  10. #30

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    I started with a Paterson tank and it's easy to load but it always seems to leak fixer...
    I got hold of a Kinderman stainless tank and the other day I got a bunch of reels so I am going to play with them shortly.
    I've already got the hang of loading 35mm onto them using a scrap film practicing in daylight before going into the dark, something I reccommend even with a Paterson if you haven't loaded before.

    I've also gone down the route of sticking with one dev and a couple of films and learning them before branching out.
    I went with ID11 as that was all my local camera shop had and I've got a bulk loader which I had Plus X in and now I have Delta 400 in and I've dabbled with a couple of other films (loving Acros 100!) but seriously resist the temptation to try heaps of films and chems at the start. I'm at the point now where I am starting to experiment with different chems and films to see where it takes me.

    I got a good mercury thermometer. It's a pain to read but oh so accurate.
    Also got some spirit thermometers which are less accurate but easier to read.
    I've used a digital, damn it's easy just reading a screen! But have a real one as a backup for if the digi dies...

    Timer...I have a clockwork timer that is rather erratic so I use the timer on my iPhone.
    A friend of mine has a digital countdown shower timer which works a treat.
    I have also set up multiple timers for each step on my laptop and just hit go for the appropriate one at the start of each step but honestly it wasn't worth the mucking around...
    I usually dev mine at a higher dilution (ID11 at 1+3) as a one shot which has a longer dev time so minor inaccuracy in timing has less effect anyway and one shot means easier consistency and no calculating extra times or replenishments.
    Works for me.

    The Ilford wash regimen of fill invert dump etc works but do it a bit more than they say.
    Acros in particular seems to need a lot more wash...

    Drying...I have a set of film clips, upper ones to hold the film and lower ones weighted to keep a bit of tension on to reduce curling.
    I hang them from a coat hanger over the shower rail but I've just got a plywood drying cabinet with racks and ventilation slots but keeps most dust and insects away and most important the bloody kittens!
    They just LOVE the taste of silver jelly and kitten tooth marks really mess up your negs!

    There is nothing nicer than opening that tank and pulling your very first roll of begs off the reel....enjoy and welcome to the club!

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