Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,300   Posts: 1,535,826   Online: 794
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    169

    Reversal processing: when can I turn the lights on

    I am about to make my first attempts at reversal processing; I plan on doing sheet film. I process on hangers in a deep tank.

    Processing is done in a film changing room, and the ventilation is... well... it's not ventilated. At what point in the process can I take the film out into room light?

    I will be following the procedure listed in the 3rd edition of the Darkroom Cookbook.


    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,247
    Images
    148
    Once you've done the reversal exposure then in theory you can leave the lights on. In practice as long as you're not workingt in sunlight there won't be a problem.

    Ian

  3. #3
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Misissauaga Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,939
    Images
    29
    Or, if you are reversing chemically, after the reversing bath. I usally wait until after a water rinse that follows the reversing bath for my DIY process. I use a tiny bit of an obscure compound I bought from JD Photochem prior to thier closing for my B&W reversals called sodium borohydride. I prefere it to tin based ones, which I regard as toxic big time.
    my real name, imagine that.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    169
    Thank you Ian.

    Mike: I plan on starting with re-exposing the film with light. 150w bulb seems to be what's recommended. I may explore chemical reversal, but not until I get the hang of things. What would you say the advantages of chemical reversal are, with the obvious exception of the fact that you don't have to take the film off the reel?

    Thanks!

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Winnipeg, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,301
    You can leave the film on the reel, worked just fine 40+ years ago for Anscochrome and b&w reversal with a light bulb, no reason it won't work these days.
    Bob

  6. #6
    Athiril's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Melbourne, Vic, Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,499
    Images
    28
    You dont have to take the film off the reel!

    And damage it (esp with re-threading while wet!) handy for long rolls and multiple rolls.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    169
    Great news! I'm useless at loading stainless reels. I prefer the Patterson plastic ones, but they're impossible to load when wet. Thanks!

  8. #8
    Jim Noel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,835
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Marco Buonocore View Post
    Great news! I'm useless at loading stainless reels. I prefer the Patterson plastic ones, but they're impossible to load when wet. Thanks!
    To load plastic reels when wet, hold them and film under water.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  9. #9
    dr5chrome's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    445
    Images
    12
    ..wait to go light until the next step after the 2nd development.

    dw

  10. #10
    Oxleyroad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Hawthorn Oz.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    774
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Noel View Post
    To load plastic reels when wet, hold them and film under water.
    I used to unload the film from reels, and reload under water. It did help prevent damage to the emulsion. I don't bother unloading now as I have found there is no need.

    I use a 150w flood light in the dakroom and I open the developing tank once the clearing bath is in. After the clearing bath time is up, and I have the film washing in water, I lift the film reels out of the tank and roll around to get light to every part of the film surface.
    Cheers - Andy C
    ---------------------

    16mm Cine, 35mm, 120, 5x4 & 7x5.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin