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  1. #21

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    Again thanks guys for sharing. Thomas I am going to try your replenishment system.

    Thanks

  2. #22
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by padraigm View Post
    Again thanks guys for sharing. Thomas I am going to try your replenishment system.

    Thanks
    Great! Let us know how it goes. And let it be known I'm only following Ethol's recommendation. I had nothing to do with it.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  3. #23

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    For long shelf life LPD powder is the one to buy. My guess is 130 would be a longer lasting developer in a Nova unit but could stain prints eventually. Unlike Dektol, LPD does NOT leave ugly black deposits on the bottom of trays and contains no Metol. The developer tonal shifts are minor. No miracles, can't make a warm paper cold. Does a good job producing mushroom silver tones on Ilford WT or EMAKS

    LPD has a longer shelf life, lasts longer in the tray, and has a higher print capacity than Dektol. However, we are talking maybe 10% to 20% higher capacity and shelf life. No miracles.
    RJ

  4. #24
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    [QUOTE=......... Unlike Dektol, LPD does NOT leave ugly black deposits on the bottom of trays and contains no Metol................ [/QUOTE]

    I don't know why but I have never had this problem. Water difference?
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  5. #25
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    I came back to change my spelling and put the k in Dektol but it was too late to edit.

    10%-20%? Pull the other leg, it's got bells on. Maybe 20% greater capacity if one mixes it up and prints straight through to exhaustion, something I have never, ever managed to do in 30+ years of on again off again darkroom work. But tray life of the working solution? I'd say that is dramatically better.

    Plus I like the lack of staining (I DO get black deposits - maybe not "stains" as they do wipe off with water, but they're a mess anyway - with Dektol) and I like the tonality I get slightly better. LPD costs more but lasts, in my experience, dramatically longer. I'm staying with LPD, at least for non-warm-tones on neutral papers.

  6. #26
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    OK, never noticed and I always rinse the trays immediately after use. While I have tried other film developers, I never tried other paper developers. Oh, when I first started out, I did use those tri-chemical packs and or some kind of Kodak Universal developer. I only contact printed and used whatever Sears sold in the camera dept. Ignorance is bliss.
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  7. #27
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Dektol works fine, don't get me wrong. My complaints with it are that it oxidizes so quickly at working strength and it turns black and anywhere it touches there will be drops you thought you cleaned but didn't, that will dry black.

  8. #28
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    Hi Roger, yeah, I understand. Until reading on APUG about other developers, such as Ansco 130, LPD, etc., I just never gave it a thought. I use to use Ethol UFG Film Developer when I lived in Chicago and would get it at Central Camera. Later, living out in the country, the choice was either Kodak or Kodak. Anyway, I as just saying I have used Ethol products before and never had any problems. However, I use to use a lot more chemicals which probably will change when I get my darkroom set up again and its good to know this info. TY
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  9. #29
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    I love this developer. It's been my preferred liquid for about 4-5 years now. But, just out of habit most likely, after a couple of days of printing, I just toss it, and mix it fresh. Or even fresh for each session. I learned a long time ago, there's no need to be frugal when it comes to investing in the time/paper spent printing for hours on end, by re-using developer.

    Also, I use both Fotokemika, and Foma fiber papers (love Foma 542), with it, and they always come out beautiful.
    If the lens doesn't read "ZEISS", then it just isn't.

  10. #30
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rolleijoe View Post
    I love this developer. It's been my preferred liquid for about 4-5 years now. But, just out of habit most likely, after a couple of days of printing, I just toss it, and mix it fresh. Or even fresh for each session. I learned a long time ago, there's no need to be frugal when it comes to investing in the time/paper spent printing for hours on end, by re-using developer.

    Also, I use both Fotokemika, and Foma fiber papers (love Foma 542), with it, and they always come out beautiful.
    Reusing the developer with replenishment is not a choice in frugality. It's a choice of liking the results better. Leftover bromides and other processing byproducts are, in my world good for the print.

    You may or may not agree.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

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