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  1. #11

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    I'm recording entire television episodes onto films. I'm starting with Looney Tunes cartoons. I know that it's going to take some trial and error, but I was curious what people might recommend. An ND filter would help, but I'd rather not buy anymore camera stuff, and I'm already using a polarizer. Coffee seems like an interesting idea.

  2. #12
    SMBooth's Avatar
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    So your filming TV shows from the television on to B&W film.. is that right.

  3. #13
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    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  4. #14
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    I've played with tv stills and video monitor stills in the past for fun and to see what kinda effects I could get.

    This is what I'm thinking:
    What your hoping: really cool dragged out long exposure like star trails of light painting of the entire scene.

    What is likely to happen: one terribly over exposed blank scene devoid of detail. The screen will emit light across the whole image viewing area. I wish I could remember the photographic artist's name which did long exposures of entire films in the movie theater with a large format camera. The screen would be entirely white, and the seats and isles, and stage would be nicely exposed from the reflected glow of the projected movie. People were erased from this long exposure, quite sublime and Erie.

    What I suggest:
    In order to preserve viewable information, you should look at multiple exposures instead. And get multiple scenes on a piece of film which you can actually print. Try low and fast speed films with different combinations of exposure times and X number of multiple exposures on that frame.

    Good luck

  5. #15
    MDR
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    Sugimoto's cinema series comes to mind the screen is extremely overexposed = white the room is correctly exposed. I'd say meter for the room / shadow minus maybe one stop and let the screen turn white. No overexposure and no special developer necessary.

    Dominik

  6. #16
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    From what I understand you want to severely overexpose some film, which would normally call for pull development. But since you say your scene contrast is already going to be weak, pull development or POTA may not be the right choice, as both would reduce contrast even more. One thing that may work in your direction is reciprocity failure, I assume you will stop your lens all the way down, reduce screen brightness as far as possible and you said you use a polarizer. Anything that would require an exposure of more than 1s with this setup will appear darker than you expect from linear calculation, so contrast will be increased.

    Obtaining a developer which decreases speed while maintaining contrast will require home brewing and experimentation. I would think about a high contrast developer with lots of restrainer, but that's just my initial approach. How far are you willing to go with this?
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

  7. #17
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by clayne View Post
    +1
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  8. #18
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MDR View Post
    Sugimoto's cinema series comes to mind the screen is extremely overexposed = white the room is correctly exposed. I'd say meter for the room / shadow minus maybe one stop and let the screen turn white. No overexposure and no special developer necessary.

    Dominik
    Ah yes, Sugimoto. I was a bit to lazy to google it haha. but yes he was the person I was refering to in my previous post.

  9. #19

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    Thanks for all your input(s). Rudeofus has the right idea. Except the reason why I'm using Neopan is to avoid (as much as possible) the failure rate. I might have to embrace the low contrast. I think a better question I should have asked would be, what starting point would everyone recommend, but I'll learn as I go. Right now it's just a fun little project that I might be more serious about as I go. The idea does resemble Sugimoto's Theaters, but I'm not including any of the "room". The television screen would make up the entire photograph.

  10. #20
    Rudeofus's Avatar
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    musila, you still haven't mentioned how far you want to take these experiments. It looks very much like nobody on APUG has done anything similar so technically you are on your own. If you are willing to home brew, this posting lists a number of developers with increasing contrast. You can find recipes for these devs in the Darkroom Cookbook or on digital truth.

    As restrainers you can use KBr or benzotriazole, others were mentioned on APUG but may be difficult to get. My approach would be starting with a 5 stop over exposure (IDK to which exposure time this translates in your setup) and one of the tough guys (D-72, D-19) and let's say double the restrainer to begin with. If negs are too thick, develop less and/or use more restrainer. If contrast is too high/low, try again with a different dev from the list. Make sure, you distinguish carefully between contrast and density.

    Once you got a good combo, increase your overexposure in 2 or 3 stop increments and adjust your soup until you have the final output you are after. Good luck!
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

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