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  1. #1

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    how to develop this more "effectively"...

    I'm doing a project where I am knowingly overexposing a "scene" and I absolutely cannot help it. This "scene" is also going to result in a low contrast negative. This project is being shot on roll film. I'm curious on what you would think the best way to develop these negs were. I'm thinking of trying split developing, (maybe d23 with a Kodalk bath) or a quick Dektol bath? Develop them normally, and bleach then after? I know the the negs aren't going to be perfect, but I'm trying to get the best I can out of them. The film is Fuji Neopan Arcos 100 because its reciprocity failure rate, if that matters.

    Any suggestions?

  2. #2
    MDR
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    Musila please excuse my question but what are you photographing and what are you trying to achieve. Overexposure usually does not result in a low con negative quiet the contrary in fact underexposure would result in low con negs. Overexposing is way enhance contrast. White on white would be the exceptions. Split developing usually lowers the contrast even more. So again my question what are you photographing and what are you trying to achieve.

    Dominik

  3. #3
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    If the images are severely overexposed (part of the image over the shoulder, on the flat part) that is permanent damage. Image detail is gone. Just like under exposure. You can't develop something that is not there.

    I'd just process as normal.

  4. #4

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    hi musila

    i regularly over expose my film .. sometimes by 3 or 4 even 5 stops.
    i have a developer and method that works for me. it involves using coffee for a developer.
    i am not sure where you live, and if you have instant coffee, vit c powder and washing soda ( sodium carbonate )
    available to you. i mix it strong ( maybe 2x stronger than the standard american tsp/tbs recipe ) i think at least
    i don't really measure anything to be honest ... then i add a splash of print developer ( i use ansco 130 because
    i have been using it for about 10 years both as a print developer and dilute as a film developer ) ...
    i stand develop for about 25 mins, maybe 30 mins and my film comes out great.
    not super dense, not thin ... neopan loves coffee developer, over exposed it is a dream to work with.

    just do a test run with whatever developer you choose to use ..
    and over expose a whole roll by 4 stops and see what happens ...

    have fun!
    john

  5. #5

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    My first response to severe overexposure would be to use severe underdevelopment. That will probably mean diluting your developer to keep dev-time from being too short.

    Regarding image-loss on the shoulder: The position of the shoulder depends to some extent on the developer being used. For example, POTA creates a huge dynamic range, which in essence, means the shoulder got pushed to the right on the H&D curve.

    But whatever you do, as another poster said, test first on scrap-film.

    Mark Overton

  6. #6
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    Neutral density filter?
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    If the images are severely overexposed (part of the image over the shoulder, on the flat part) that is permanent damage. Image detail is gone. Just like under exposure. You can't develop something that is not there.

    I'd just process as normal.
    I'd be one to say that this is not strictly always the case. Things aren't gone, they're just overly saturated to the point of difficulty in recovering it - which is not impossible. But what we're talking here is +2, +3 stops, not +0.5/1.0 stops. In essence the curve steps into compression of the shoulder. What is then needed is resultant expansion.

    As we all know, this cannot be done with digital mediums, so take advantage!
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  8. #8
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    Do I understand that this is meant to be a learning exercise? If so then why not go ahead and overexpose and then reduce development a bit and then see what your negs look like, i.e. look at the contrast index. Chances are you just need to tune the grade of your paper. Multigrade makes a lot of these issues go away, and split grade printing can solve all kinds of things.

    Another good exercise would be to develop identical shots a few different ways... e.g. one neg with a very compensating developer, another with a pyro developer, another with your ordinary brew.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  9. #9
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    Yep, well said.

    In fact the best thing people can do is not try to follow any rules whatsoever and figure out what the actual limits of their materials are.

    Remember: you are working with materials that freely allow you, and sometimes reward you, for walking outside the bounds. Make use of this!
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by keithwms View Post
    Do I understand that this is meant to be a learning exercise? If so then why not go ahead and overexpose and then reduce development a bit and then see what your negs look like, i.e. look at the contrast index. Chances are you just need to tune the grade of your paper. Multigrade makes a lot of these issues go away, and split grade printing can solve all kinds of things.

    Another good exercise would be to develop identical shots a few different ways... e.g. one neg with a very compensating developer, another with a pyro developer, another with your ordinary brew.
    its ALL a learning exercise


    Quote Originally Posted by clayne View Post
    Yep, well said.

    In fact the best thing people can do is not try to follow any rules whatsoever and figure out what the actual limits of their materials are.

    Remember: you are working with materials that freely allow you, and sometimes reward you, for walking outside the bounds. Make use of this!
    exactly!

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