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  1. #11
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dehk View Post
    Also can use Hypo, it will help shorten it a little bit too.
    Derek probably means Hypo Clearing Agent, not Hypo, because Hypo is an old name for fixer, and fixer is what you need to wash out.

    And for RC, Hypo Clearing Agent really doesn't make much difference.

    For RC, I would suggest doing what you have been doing. Then take your prints home and within a day or so wash them for a couple of minutes each in a small tray in your laundry sink, kitchen sink, shower or bathtub. Cool water flowing fairly slowly will work fine - just make sure the print doesn't stick face down in the tray.

    If you leave anything more than a trace of fixer in your print, it won't tone evenly, it won't last well and will probably discolour and stain. And if you allow a fixer laden print to contact other, otherwise properly washed prints, they too can be damaged.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  2. #12
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    how so ?
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  3. #13
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    You don't need running water, even for FB. You can use successive soaks in changes of still water. This is a bit of a PITA but works well and doesn't use as much water. I don't have running water in my darkroom yet either. For 8x10 and smaller prints I can bring them upstairs and wash in the sink. For larger prints I don't have a large enough sink to wash them anyway (I suppose I could use the bathtub but that's too big.)

    For FB I suggest the modified Ilford fix/wash sequence. Fix for one minute in film strength rapid fixer with no hardner. Wash for ten minutes - two soaks of at least 5 minutes each in fresh water will do. Follow this by 10 minutes with continuous agitation in a washing aid (like hypo clearing agent) then Ilford recommends a 10 minute running water wash. I err on the side of caution and do a final wash of six, ten minute soaks in trays of fresh water. It's a lot more trouble than just putting them in an archival washer and going away, but you can get a good wash, and save water too. You can learn a ton about washing prints from this article:

    Part 1:

    http://www.film-and-darkroom-user.or...read.php?t=296

    Part 2:

    http://www.film-and-darkroom-user.or...read.php?t=344

    What I do have in my darkroom is a 7 gallon water jug with a spigot, that I can fill from the water hose just outside the basement door. It isn't ideal, but it works much better than you might think.

  4. #14
    EKDobbs's Avatar
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    Thanks for the advice everyone. I can extend the soaking wash process, as well as bring them home in the afternoon to truly wash them. Hopefully the ones I've already made won't spontaneously blacken on me...
    In other worlds he has
    darker days, blacker swells.
    Strokes that mix noir revenge
    on waves of grey.

  5. #15
    artonpaper's Avatar
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    You should also bear in mind that improperly washed prints can contaminate properly washed prints they come in contact with as well as any paper and fabric such as storage boxes and so forth. Drying screens too. The multi tray sequential soak method as well as the modified Ilford method for fiber is the best way to go, I think, for you.

  6. #16

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    Not washing related but why are you trying to squeeze in a printing session between classes ? Do yourself and your work a favor by giving them the proper time in the darkroom.

  7. #17
    ParkerSmithPhoto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EKDobbs View Post
    So I'm a little stuck. I have a darkroom, and it's doing wonders for my learning in the art of B&W photography. I've got a workflow set up and everything. Now, just like a lot of you, my darkroom is not as decked out as I'd like it to be. Primarily, I have no running water, and no way to quickly access it.
    Get a faucet adapter to convert a standard faucet to a hose fitting, and then run hose with a garden sprayer to your darkroom, even if it's fifty feet. Sounds like a pain, but having access to water will save you a ton of time in the darkroom. My sink is currently served by a ten foot hose that runs across the room to a tap. The difference between that and the old days of having to cart water in a bucket is like the difference between a rickshaw and a Mercedes. Sounds stupid, but it's a massive improvement.
    Parker Smith Photography, Inc.
    Atlanta, GA

    Commercial & Fine Art Photography
    Portrait Photography

  8. #18
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    One way around this is to hold your prints in a tray until you're done then wash the prints in the bathroom or kitchen when you're done. I remember two great guys I worked for that had a commercial photo studio. They had a make-shift darkroom and they washed their prints in the bathroom. They rigged a tumbling Arkay print washer to train into the toilet. The water hookup was the faucet. With RC prints, you can't let them sit too long or else the RC layer will separate. You can buy a Kodak tray siphon and set your washing tray on the kitchen or bathroom counter and drain into a basin or sink.

  9. #19
    Rick A's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EKDobbs View Post
    Thanks for the advice everyone. I can extend the soaking wash process, as well as bring them home in the afternoon to truly wash them. Hopefully the ones I've already made won't spontaneously blacken on me...
    Properly fixed prints, tho unwashed, will not spontaneously turn black. That only happens to under or unfixed prints.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  10. #20
    bsdunek's Avatar
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    Back in the day, tub type washers were popular. I made one back in the 60's from a galvanized steel washtub, some brass tubing, hose fittings, etc. The water sprays in at an angle at the top to keep it swirling and the drain is in the bottom with a piece of hose held up with wire to control the depth of water. I'm still using it today. You just can't put too many prints at a time in it as they sometimes want to stick together or along the side.
    Bruce

    Moma don't take my Kodachrome away!
    Oops, Kodak just did!
    For all practical purposes, they've taken Kodak away.


    BruceCSdunekPhotography.zenfolio.com

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