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  1. #1

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    Arista EDU ultra 100 in 4 X 5 -- a developing question

    I'm a newbie using this film in my also-new 4 by 5 Zero Image camera and so seek guidance. What is the best way to process this film after dealing with all the reciprocity failure stuff -- I've been developing it as instructed in D-76 diluted 1:1 for "8 to 10 minutes" which is confusing enough -- I start pouring the developer into a daylight drop-tank at 10 minutes -- and the development seems fine.

    However, I've noticed the film seems to be extremely granular and there seem to be slightly dark slotches in the sky areas -- randomly distributed, not sure if they're a problem with the development, or how the film is made, or whatever. The granularity is also interesting -- haven't seen anything like it since I did some minox film (asa 100 ilford, if memory serves) in Rodinol and it came out really grainy.

    So, what do people advice? I just bought 100 sheets of the stuff so there's ample room to learn.

    I should note that I haven't actually made any prints yet -- I've been scanning the negatives with a canoscan 9000, which crops them a bit but does fine. When I learn better I may want to try some fuji Acros ... then again, if I continue to have trouble with this stuff I may get discouraged, and what fun is that?

  2. #2
    John Austin's Avatar
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    A few dead sheets at the beginning is nothing to get discouraged about, as long as we can find out why they died, and true experimentation is fun

    Can you make high res' scans of an offending areas, crop them down to little bits that show the problem as big enlargements of those small bits that can be posted here so the assembled throng can help?

    Failing that, you write of granularity, this should not be visible at all with a 100asa film in 5x4", so I am wondering if you really mean reticulation, a mottlingish effect that is caused when the jelly emulsion is put under stress, such as by sudden extreme changes in temperature or acidity

    Blotchyness can be caused by uneven development, so a careful pouring in of dev' and agitation should clear that up

    Can you do an APUG search for a member physically near you who you cold show the negs to over a coffee or a few beers?

    Try to get the scans up if you can

  3. #3

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    Hello;
    I noticed that you shoot 35mm format. Developing 4X5 film is a different animal, much easier to get uneven development. I would try and presoak the film in water for 3-4 minutes before pouring in the developer. Be sure to keep the temperature close on the chemicals and water to keep the grain in check. I also use D-76 full strength and add D-76r at 1 ounce per 80 square inches. Freestyle sells LegacyPro D-76 and D-76r. I would think that 8-10 minutes would be good times for this combo. Another good developer to use would be Xtol, and you can replenish with fresh developer. I reuse my fixer and mix up a new batch every two months. I use an old Arkay daylight tank for developing my sheet film. A Yankee or FR sheet film tank works well also. Have fun experimenting, Steven.

  4. #4

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    a sample of the problem, if it is one

    Here's a cutout sample showing the blotching, or whatever it is -- it almost looks like clumping, hard to say .... this is a small segment of a 4 by 5 neg, perhaps half an inch across.

    Another observation -- I notice this problem most on negatives shot with the camera in its 25mm mode -- extreme wide-angle. At 50mm I don't see it -- could it be a factor of the acute angle the light hits the film? At the farther reaches of the film the angle is awfully acute, not to mention pretty dim.

    I do pre-soak the film, if only to get rid of the blue/green anti-hillation backing so my chemistry stays clear. I try to watch my temperatures as closely as a kitchen sink and thermometer allows, so I don't think it's reticulation.

    thanks to all...anyone near ogden, utah? I can travel to slc easily

    Click image for larger version. 

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  5. #5
    jp498's Avatar
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    I had problems like this with this film. I ended up switching to tf-4 fixer and it took care of the problem. Kodak and foma fixer didn't take care of it, nor did changing developers. I'm really glad, not just so I can continue to use the film, but because tf-4 is a great fixer for all film.

    Similar issues can be caused by dust as well, but you'd see non-round things like strands of fiber material and such. If you're new to 4x5, clean your holders before you load them and keep them in dust free conditions except when in the camera. I use anti-static plastic bags for my holders.

  6. #6

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    tf4, eh? that's the formulary stuff? Well, maybe i need to order some more Ilford sheet film anyway....but i have 100 sheets of this foma stuff i would love to end up thinking is great stuff, considering the cost savings ... thanks, and I will redouble cleanliness.

  7. #7
    jp498's Avatar
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    Yes, the formulary stuff. The foma/arista stuff is good to me with tf4 fixer.

    If you're having reciprocity issues/concerns, it might be worthwhile to find a film that is made to handle long exposures better. I know kodak tmy2 does that well because I use it, but I haven't studied Ilford's options.

  8. #8

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    The reciprocity stuff is mostly just getting used to a film in which the reciprocity curve resembles a falling brick -- I'm used Acros 100 in my 120 camera and it's really good, practically none out to two minutes or so, whereas with the Arista you are pretty close to the little calculator that comes with the zeroimage camera which has u multiplying by 5 and 10 pretty quickly.

    But as I say, I'm in a learning curve here myself and anxious to do so -- the Arista ought to be good for daylight stuff, which has always been the majority of what I did anyway, and I can look around for other things for dimmer use. Definitely anxious to try some of that formulary fixer too...

  9. #9

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    Hello;
    If you are going to use the t-grain films, Tmax, Delta, and Acros I would look at the Formulary's TF-5. Steven.

  10. #10

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    thanks steve -- I'll keep that in mind. right now going to use the ilford fp4 and arista -- to t-grain films have a better reciprocity curve? I know acros sure does...

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