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  1. #11
    zsas's Avatar
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    You can store em all in a five gal bucket from Home Depot/Lowes for $3. Make sure to keep chems locked, out of reach/knock of kids/animals

    One thermometer shd suffice, give a rinse after each dip in the chems
    Andy

  2. #12
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    I would suggest one funnel and one or two beakers (or measuring cups). Use two only when you have to mix liquids 1:1. Otherwise, using only one at a time (for whatever the next chemical is) will prevent you from dumping in the wrong chemical at the wrong time and potentially ruining your images. Use the funnel for whatever is going to be returned to a bottle next. Rinse the beaker and funnel between steps.

    To me, wooden clothes pins are preferable over film clips.

    I like liquid concentrates as long as the costs can be similar; it's nice not having chemical dust in the air or about the darkroom. You could mix outdoors if needed. Powdered products sometimes take a while to dissolve too, which is either a delay or a boring wait. You should have a wash bucket and a big ladel/spoon or something to mix up to a gallon of liquid in too. I don't share these with the kitchen.

    Dilute the developer before use. I use plastic juice/gatorade jugs for chemicals. (off limits to children of course)

  3. #13
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darren Guy View Post
    When I get the chemistry here, and after it has been opened, should I store the concentrate in the bottle that it comes in or transfer it?
    Depends on how fast you use it.

    When I get on a roll, I can use a gallon of D-76 in less than a week. That's mostly in the summer when the weather is warm. In the winter, I might process a couple-few rolls per month.

    When I'm using it fast, I don't bother decanting into smaller bottles. I just keep it in a gallon jug.
    When I'm using it slowly, I decant into half gallon or quart bottles and screw the lids on tight.

    According to the film gods in the land of Kodak, D-76 will keep for six months in a full bottle with the lid screwed on tight but it will only last for two months in a half-full bottle.

    When you're talking about liquid concentrate in bottles from the manufacturer, I suggest a similar approach. Don't bother decanting unless the bottle starts getting empty and you don't think you'll use the stuff before it gets old. If you think you'll use it up, why bother pouring into other containers?

    Besides, leaving chemicals in their original containers with all of the instructions and safety information is a smart thing to do.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  4. #14

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    In reference to post #9, I would advise against re-using the developer when you are new to this. Particularly when you're first learning, you want to eliminate as many variables as you can to keep things as repeatable and consistent as possible. There are enough variables to manage without adding adjustments for developer re-use. Use the working solution one-shot. This will help you get better starting points.

  5. #15
    Leigh B's Avatar
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    I have two completely separate sets of utensils... one for developer and one for everything else.

    Always thoroughly rinse containers immediately after use to avoid chemical residue build-up.

    - Leigh
    “Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something.” - Plato

  6. #16
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    Have a read of the FAQ in my signature, it answers many of your questions. Some additional points:
    - start off with one-shot developers and no re-use
    - Leigh's points on no-partial-mixes and diluting stock/concentrate immediately before use are important
    - if you're buying liquid concentrate devs, just use the bottle it came in
    - thermometers are generally only used in developers (as that's the only temp-critical step); don't put them in fixer or stop bath
    - have dedicated separate (and well-labelled, including the lids) containers for dev/stop/fix to prevent contamination
    - dev is the only thing that will really go off. Stop is just acid (using water is fine, you don't need stop for film) and fixer will last many years as concentrate.
    - track the number of rolls through your fixer so you don't use exhausted fixer and read this
    - while Ilford chems are excellent, they can be expensive and matching dev/film brands is a silly reason to pick a chemical
    - just one 500mL (with 50mL marks) measuring beaker/graduate is about all you need for measuring, plus a couple smaller (5mL, 25mL) syringes
    - mix up your fix in PETE or glass bottles (buy 1-1.5L water, use scales or beaker to pour out 20% of the water, replace with rapid fixer concentrate to get the 1+4 dilution)

    You can pour developer (diluted heavily) down the drain, but exhausted fix is silver-rich and toxic to sewer/septic processing systems. Take it to a film lab; they will extract the silver and dispose of it safely.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by LJH View Post
    I'd avoid getting to know Kodak chemicals; who knows if they'll still be available next week?
    That's a good strategy to ensure that they won't be...


  8. #18

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    Wow. Lots of good information to digest. I thank everyone for their responses, and I feel much more comfortable with the purchases I need to make as well as the processes to take. Hopefully by the end of the week I'll be ready to start. Can't wait.

    I'm sure I'll have more questions as I go, and I'd glad I've found such a helpful forum.

  9. #19
    MattKing's Avatar
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    With regard to temperature ....

    If your room temperature is somewhere between 68F and 74F, the easiest and most reliable approach is to use your chemistry (including wash water) at that temperature.

    The developing time will change with different temperatures, but there are charts to deal with that.

    Personally, I like having multiple graduated beakers, because I like having the option of setting up all my chemistry in a line before starting, but the alternative approach works too, and helps prevent using the chemistry out of order.

    Have you seen these two documents?:

    1) Kodak: http://wwwtr.kodak.com/global/en/pro...bs/aj3/aj3.pdf

    2) Ilford: http://www.ilfordphoto.com/Webfiles/200629163442455.pdf
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  10. #20
    Leigh B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
    - while Ilford chems are excellent, they can be expensive and matching dev/film brands is a silly reason to pick a chemical
    Sorry to disagree... but I disagree.

    I prefer to use film and chemistry from the same company. At least you know that the developing time recommendations are as accurate as they can be.

    Ilford is strongly committed to black & white photography. The other folks are strongly committed to maximizing their profits.

    The only yellow-box chemistry I use is the stop bath. I haven't used any of their sensitized products (except Kodachrome) for many decades.

    - Leigh
    “Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something.” - Plato

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