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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
    Have a read of the FAQ in my signature, it answers many of your questions.
    That is an awesome and useful resource for someone line me who's developed a few rolls (less than 10) and sheets (between 10 - 20) and so while not a complete novice, still getting my processes in place. Thanks very much for the resource!

  2. #22
    clayne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leigh B View Post
    Sorry to disagree... but I disagree.

    I prefer to use film and chemistry from the same company. At least you know that the developing time recommendations are as accurate as they can be.

    Ilford is strongly committed to black & white photography. The other folks are strongly committed to maximizing their profits.

    The only yellow-box chemistry I use is the stop bath. I haven't used any of their sensitized products (except Kodachrome) for many decades.

    - Leigh
    Well then you're losing out big time on some awesome films Leigh. Why do you gotta bring that funk into this thread anyways?

    To the OP, add Tri-X and Tmax 3200 and 400 to your list of things to try out. Ilford makes great films and I use them as well, but you want to also experience the best of what Kodak has to offer right now.

    Everything else is pretty straightforward. Mix before you use, except for stop and fix which can be mixed and reused until exhausted. Fix should not be overused to capacity, though.

    Also, plan on screwing up. It's part of the learning process. I recommend the Hewes 35mm reels if you want to stay sane. Avoid the plastic tanks.

    Once you get serious, start thinking about storage of negs using polyester fold-flaps rather than the sleeves. But don't worry about this until you're shooting stuff worth preserving.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by clayne View Post
    Well then you're losing out big time on some awesome films Leigh. Why do you gotta bring that funk into this thread anyways?
    So you object to me stating my opinion, but you feel quite free to state yours? Slight disconnect there.

    I'll say what I please, without your interference.

    The only thing I'm "missing out on" is a huge advertising budget.

    - Leigh
    “Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something.” - Plato

  4. #24
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    Hello Darren and welcome to APUG. You may want to read and follow the info that Kodak and Ilford has on line, or in books as it may be helpful to the beginner. Good Luck.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leigh B View Post
    So you object to me stating my opinion, but you feel quite free to state yours? Slight disconnect there.

    I'll say what I please, without your interference.

    The only thing I'm "missing out on" is a huge advertising budget.

    - Leigh
    Except I didn't malign one or the other because I use Kodak, Ilford, Fujifilm, Efke, and Agfa and appreciate the various things that they have to offer. I guess my point is that it's probably not the best to turn off a beginner from a company which still has great things to offer. Tri-X is one of the best films ever made, no need to crap on the legacy of what remains.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by clayne View Post

    I recommend the Hewes 35mm reels if you want to stay sane. Avoid the plastic tanks.
    That's good to know. I actually ordered a used SS tank that came with those reels last weekend - 2 35 and 1 120.

  7. #27

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    i usually mix up stock solution of ID-11 and store in brown bottles until i'm ready to use it (usually the same day). i only dilute when i'm ready to process and leave the half-full bottle of stock solution until i'm ready for the next batch. even a half-full bottle of stock will last a few days until you're ready to process your next batch. i've gone as long as a week without any ill effects.

    i can do 2x 120 reels in my tank and try to stick with the same film shot at the same ISO. the results are always good.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Darren Guy View Post
    That's good to know. I actually ordered a used SS tank that came with those reels last weekend - 2 35 and 1 120.
    Compared with SS reels, I find that plastic reels are easier to get started, but harder to load. My problem is they require three hands: one to hold the left spiral, one to hold the right spiral, and the third to hold the roll. Steel reels only require two hands: one for the reel, and one for the film.

    Practice loading steel reels a few times with a scrap roll until you can confidently load it without looking. You'll learn how to feed the film into the reel with the correct amount of drag and arc. Here's a trick: Once every half rotation of the reel, gently push and pull the film. If it's loading correctly, it'll move in and out of the reel a certain distance, because it has some slack sitting in the spiral. But if it's jumped a track, it won't move in and out.

    For a used reel: Check it carefully for being bent. Use a piece of film to measure the distance at the ends of the four pairs of struts. For reels, it might be best to simply buy new Hewes reels from Freestyle Photo in Hollywood, a short drive from where you live.

    Mark Overton

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