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Thread: Kodak D-96A

  1. #21
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold33 View Post
    I suspected something like that but I wasn't sure (a nice example of internet diffusion, by the way).
    Ian, do you know a printed source for "D96 Acsorbic acid" or Modified D96 ?
    Not for the formula only the MSDS sheets and other data and Google will find them I would think.

    Ian

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    ...What's interesting with D96 (and the ascorbic version) is how it's related to Agfa 44/Agfa Ansco 17 and the Adox Borax MQ developer with it's reduced Sulphite compared to D76, this gives better effective EI, sharpness and finer grain....

    Ian
    That's not surprising. Before D-96, D-76 was the recommended negative developer for Eastman negative films. D-96 is a derivative. (D-16 was used before D-76.)

  3. #23
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nworth View Post
    That's not surprising. Before D-96, D-76 was the recommended negative developer for Eastman negative films. D-96 is a derivative. (D-16 was used before D-76.)
    Way before D76 in 1918 J. Crabtree of Eastman Kodak published a Kodelon (p-Aminophenol hydrochloride) developer for Cine film processing, GEK Mees had worked on these developers in the UK while at Wratten and Wainright before loining Eastman Kodak as head of research. This early cine developer is very similar to Agfa's R10 formulated by Dr Momme Andresen (of Rodinal fame) a few years earlier.

    This 1918 formula is also the first mention of Kodelon as an EK proprietary name for p-Amininophenol Hydrochloride.

    Kodak Rapid pAmininophenol Cine developer (Crabtree 1918)

    p-Aminophenol hydrochloride / Kodelon 7g
    Sodium Sulphite (anhyd) 50g
    Sodium Carbonate (anhyd0) 50g
    Water to 1 litre
    Time 1 min at 95°F / 35°C

    By adding 10% (100g) of Sodium Sulphate the development time may be increased to 3 minutes.

    Ian

  4. #24

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    Ian:

    Your comments about the similarity of Agfa 17 to D-96 got me thinking. D-96 was introduced with the switch to thin emulsion films, at the same time XT replaced Background-X. (A mistake in my opinion. While not quite as sharp as XT, Background-X was a beautiful film.) The recommended for use of D-76 with the still film of that day and today is diluted 1+1 as a one shot. That is not suitable for motion picture lines, so D-96 was developed. Today's films are different yet, and a small controversy has developed over which produces the better quality - D-76 undiluted or D-76 1+1. Perhaps it is worth exploring Agfa 17/Ansco 44 as a possibly superior compromise.

  5. #25

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    The formula given by nworth using NaBr is the correct one as published by Kodak on their motion picture film site. The Kodak formula gives NaBr as 0.35 g rather than in milligrams. Typically Kodak used sodium salts in many of their formulas. It was described as giving slightly higher granularity and sharpness than D-96. At the time the formula was released laws restricting the release of hydroquinone in ground water in Europe had become quite strict. It is listed in my notes as D-96a. I feel sure that if the name had been different then there would be a different name in my notes.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 03-23-2012 at 12:37 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

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  6. #26
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Gerald, it would appear that this developer goes back to at least the early 1990's when Kodak published a document on Environmental process development, they din't name it as D96a rather just as an Ascorbic acid version of D96, this is the same in the MSDS sheets and hazard labelling which call it D96 Ascorbic acid. The formula is identical (both using Potassium Bromide) except for the substitution of 2 g L-ascorbic acid for the 1.5g of Hydroquinone.

    Tests of the two versions showed that the graininess was identical, the ascorbic acid version gave a slightly lower D-max and that increasing the Ascobic acid level did not have the expected results (of increased activity). In addition the acsorbic version oxidised faster so didn't keep as well.

    Kodak did publish some cine film developers with the option to use Potassium or Sodium Bromide giving the alternative weights needed.

    Ian

  7. #27

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    Hi Ian,

    The formula that I have appeared on the Kodak website and it appears in my notes as D-96a. That name seems to be the one used on the website. The date on the backup file is 10/11/2004 but the original file is probably about 2 years older.

    Since this formula contains no chelating agent to protect the ascorbic acid its use is probably not recommended.

    Jerry
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 03-23-2012 at 02:42 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  8. #28
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    The references I have to Kodak's D96 Ascorbic Acid developer indicate quite clearly that it pre-dates Xtol which is interesting, and was published in an article in 1993 . (It may be older than that of course).

    It was an ec-friendly alternative to D96 but it wasn't a replacement and test showed it wasn't quite as good.

    Ian

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