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  1. #11
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aron View Post
    I store all my film (Delta 100 and HP5+) in the freezer, usually for many months, which is occasionally set as low as -40C, but usually -24C, according to my trusty thermometer. Never had this problem.
    I buy my film so fresh that it doesn't have to be stored in the freezer. For what it's worth, the film I used never saw a freezer.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  2. #12

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    Hard to tell from the pictures what is really going on. Best would be to send it to Ilford as Mr. Galley suggests. Try examining a sheet which has been treated identically but not processed. This could help rule out processing faults.

    My experiences are that Ilford and Kodak films are remarkably tough. Barring a defect, it seems odd to me freezing the film for storage would result in faults if handled correctly. Maybe a moisture issue in the freezer? Not sure. But if Thomas and others have observed a similar fault without freezing I guess that would rule out problems due to freezing.

    As an aside, I don't freeze my materials. Unless you are planning on stocking years worth of B&W film/paper or the ambient temperatures in your home are high, there's no real point to frozen storage in my opinion - especially if you're using a household no-frost freezer which cycles the temperature.

  3. #13
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    My first guess would be reticulation but OP says he keeps his process temps regulated to ±1ºC. That shouldn't be a problem.
    Maybe it's the freezer. I don't know. I've never heard of that happening unless you take the film directly from the freezer and put it into a hot room.

    Are you sure it's a defect IN the emulsion and not merely on the surface? (e.g. Some kind of surface contamination?)
    Are you sure it's actually on the emulsion side and not on the base?

    If I was in your position, I'd take a sheet, expose it, process it and examine the result, sacrificing one sheet for the sake of science.

    On the other hand, Simon offered to look into it for you. If there is one guy on the planet who can get to the bottom of this problem, it is he.
    Send him a sheet of film that's got this problem. While you are at it, send him a sheet of unexposed, unprocessed film from the same batch. Put it inside a plastic sandwich bag and seal it between two sheets of cardboard. Seal it, all four sides, with gaffer's tape. Just for good measure, look on the original package, get the batch number and write it on the cardboard.

    The price of a couple-few postage stamps and an envelope is good insurance to see that your pictures are as good as they can be. Isn't it?
    Randy S.

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    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  4. #14
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Worker 11811 View Post
    Are you sure it's a defect IN the emulsion and not merely on the surface? (e.g. Some kind of surface contamination?)
    Are you sure it's actually on the emulsion side and not on the base?

    If I was in your position, I'd take a sheet, expose it, process it and examine the result, sacrificing one sheet for the sake of science.
    OP clearly states that it's on the base side of the film. I very much doubt it's process related. Examining an unexposed and undeveloped sheet would tell a lot. Just yank one from the box, and fix it out.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  5. #15
    Usagi's Avatar
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    Thank You Simon.

    I have good notes of each sheet that I have developed. I can check my negative archive, if I found something...
    Then I can send sample to Ilford Photo.


    Like Bertilsson has wrote, these markings aren't contamination marks or drying marks. But as they does not show in the printed images, I haven't investigated yet much time for this.

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