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  1. #21
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Wayne, I'd go a few steps further because negative aren't stored in the light, so rather like cave paintings the risks of damage and deterioration caused by light are minimal. Then there's archives that are regulary worked with whose negatives would almost all have been made with Pyro based developers and we are talking about major collections here none of whom have reported issues of fading of Pyro stained negatives. In some cases the glass plate have been in use for making prints for well over 60-70 years.

    Usually it's a case of finding (or proving) the cause of a known problem, however in this case it's speculation of a possible problems that's not been observed in practice in over 100 years.

    There are other far less stable photographic processes like blue toning with Ferricyanide/Iron toners and kept in the dark they will last many years with no issues.

    Ian

  2. #22

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    I ran across cyanotype prints in the Oregon Historical Society's files that were at least 80 years old and still crisp and contrasty. They had been made by a college student on a budget, so I doubt the processing was to "archival standard" had there been one at the time. I also came across glass negatives there that probably were processed in a pyro developer, and the photographer took the extra step of varnishing the emulsion side of the negative. They were absolutely beautiful to scan or print 100 years from their creation.

    Peter Gomena

  3. #23

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    Some years ago at the San Francisco Palace of the Legion of Honor I saw an early cyanotype (1860s, I think) that was as bright and clear as the day it was made. Most of its life was spent in various museum collections but not on display. Dark and good storage are beneficial.

  4. #24
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Faded cyanotypes can be regenerated by putting them in the dark for awhile. Too bad the same does not hold for silver gelatin prints.
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  5. #25
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    It can be done however, if one is willing to do the work!

    PE

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