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  1. #1
    micwag2's Avatar
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    New to developing

    I want to start developing my own B&W film. I'd like to use Kodak D76 to start with because i have documentation that walks me through the process from start to finish. While it is very descriptive of the process and mentions the D76 by name it just says for the rest "stop bath", "fixer", "photo flo", and "replenisher". Do these have product numbers? What do i need to look for when ordering? Can i find these items together in a kit? Most of where i'm shopping is online, as the local shops are "an arm and a leg" for supplies any more, so I'd like to have a good idea of what I'm looking for. Any particular places that are good with pricing and service that are recommended?

  2. #2
    Rick A's Avatar
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    Any other brand of stop and fix will suffice, just follow the directions on the label. As for rinse aid(fotoflo) I prefer Edwal LFN, only need one drop to 16oz distilled water for streak and spot free drying. Dust free is totally up to you to provide a clean space, hanging in the shower works.I don't see the need for wash aids like Sistan or hypo clearing agents before final wash and rinse. Ilford method of film washing is perfect for me. My personal brand of fixer is Formulary's TF-4, washes out quickly and longer life, increased capacity over most other brands. I buy the cheapest indicator stop I can find, they are all mostly identical, so why waste money. Some folks don't bother with chemical stop and just use a couple water rinses instead, I've been in the DR for nearly 50 years and still believe acid stop is best. Good luck with developing. BTW I'm available if you need help, if you need I can even talk you through the process, PM me for a phone number if you need help.Take the road trip and I'll give you a hands on lesson in my DR.
    I usually buy my chems from Freestyle, ocassionally from Adorama.
    Rick Allen
    Argentum aevum

  3. #3

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    Dear micwag2,

    If "Eastern Pennsylvania" means your close to Philadelphia, Calumet is a good "walk in" source. My personal suggestion to anyone starting is to purchase Kodak liquids and mix them in distilled water. Get a "Kodak Black & White Darkroom Dataguide" at the local used book store and use T-Max developer, Kodak Indicator Stop, and Kodafix fixer. These products have amazing shelf life. Keep in mind that all the other brands are quality products and are worth purchasing. Nothing in the above should be considered as a criticism of them.

    Good luck and welcome to a rewarding way of making images,

    Neal Wydra

  4. #4
    micwag2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neal View Post
    Dear micwag2,

    If "Eastern Pennsylvania" means your close to Philadelphia, Calumet is a good "walk in" source. My personal suggestion to anyone starting is to purchase Kodak liquids and mix them in distilled water. Get a "Kodak Black & White Darkroom Dataguide" at the local used book store and use T-Max developer, Kodak Indicator Stop, and Kodafix fixer. These products have amazing shelf life. Keep in mind that all the other brands are quality products and are worth purchasing. Nothing in the above should be considered as a criticism of them.

    Good luck and welcome to a rewarding way of making images,

    Neal Wydra
    I'm around Lansdale, which is north of Philly. I did read about the distilled water as being more reliable than tap water. You never know what's coming out of some taps. Is Calumet in the city or outside of it? I'm on Freestyles website now and this is what i looked up so far.
    Product Name Price Per Unit Quantity Total
    Kodak
    Photo Flo 200 16 oz. - Model# 1464510
    8.39 1 $8.39
    Kodak Indicator Stop Bath 16 oz.
    - Model# 1464247
    6.29 1 $6.29
    Kodak D-76 Film
    Developer to make 1 Gallon - Model# 1464817
    6.09 1 $6.09
    Kodak Fixer Powder To Make 1
    Gallon - Model# 1971746
    5.79 1 $5.79
    $26.56





    Am i in the right direction?

  5. #5

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    That's about right. Photo-Flo is best used by the drop, use distilled water for mixing chemicals, and for the final rinse w/ photo-flo. You can wash in tapwater.

    Edit - Welcome to the wonderful world of analog! Having a camera without doing your own processing is like having a leash without the dog.

  6. #6
    fotch's Avatar
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    Good luck with developing, really a lot of fun and thrills.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  7. #7
    Rick A's Avatar
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    I didn't look up the Freestyle numbers, but do not get fixer with hardener in it, it takes longer to fix and wash with it incorporated, and not necessary these days.
    Rick Allen
    Argentum aevum

  8. #8

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    Develop your own film is a lot of fun. BTW welcome to APUG.

    Jeff

  9. #9
    zsas's Avatar
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    I think your order is just fine, that fixer is a hardening fixer which I don't believe is a problem, plus if you happen to shoot Efke film (which needs hardener) you will be set. Asside from Efke I don't think any film needs hardener but I don't believe there is any harm using a hardening fixer for films that don't need it......ohhhh PE (Photo Engineer)???

    Anyway welcome to the club!
    Andy

  10. #10
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I too agree that the order you have posted will work fine.

    The only suggestion I would make is that a Rapid Fixer is more convenient than the Kodak standard fixer. Rapid Fixers are, however, liquid fixers and are therefore more expensive to ship.

    The Ilford Rapid Fixers (including Hypam) are non-hardening. For film, that doesn't matter much, but for fibre prints that can make a difference.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2



 

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