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  1. #1
    cinejerk's Avatar
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    Developing really old TRI-X with fog

    I have some really old tri-x and I tried developing some unexposed samples the other day.

    As you would expect there was a bit of fog.

    I am using D-76 and normal times.

    Do you think if I over expose a bit and develop for shorter times it would help?

    Should I be using anti fog? If so, what anti fog and how much.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Richard Sintchak (rich815)'s Avatar
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    Just how old?
    -----------------------

    "Well, my photos are actually much better than they look..."

    Richard S.
    Albany, CA (San Francisco bay area)

    My Flickr River of photographs
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  3. #3
    cinejerk's Avatar
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    Hi there rich815

    You know I really don't know the exact age. There are no dates on the film.

    I'm guessing somewhere in the 1970's

  4. #4
    cinejerk's Avatar
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    I guess this is a difficult problem. Probably useless film.

  5. #5

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    Unless the fog is really bad, you can overexpose a bit and then just print through the increased base density. The problem with fog is that it will cover the lowest shadow details and cut shadow contrast unless you get those parts of your scene up "out of the fog" by overexposing enough.

    Underdeveloping will not help any here, just reduce contrast further. Give it an extra stop and see what happens. If the fog is so pronounced that you can't deal with it at a stop over, then it's likely not worthwhile using the film.

    Best,

    Doremus

    www.DoremusScudder.com

  6. #6
    Nelson's Avatar
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    Not necessarily useless. I shot some 70s Tri-X and it came out OK considering its age. Everything I've posted in my gallery as of today (March 27th 2012) is from 1970s Tri-X. Look at those shots and see what you think. Certainly not perfect, but maybe useful if you want the gritty, grainy effect that old film can provide. This film was not stored chilled either.

    It was fogged somewhat, but by printing it with at least a grade 2.5 or even up to a grade 4 filter in some cases, contrast wasn't bad.

    Edit: I also exposed it one stop over.

  7. #7
    cinejerk's Avatar
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    Ok thanks guys for the good replies.

  8. #8
    Peter Spangenberg's Avatar
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    I got a box of 1971 5x7 tri-x and have gotten great results as follows:
    1). I shoot it at ASA25
    2). Develop in HC-110 dilution B (800ml in a tray)
    3). Add 4g Potassium Bromide dissolved in 100ml water
    4). Developing less than 10min works best, but even with increased fog from more development they print fine. I develop by inspection, so I can get away with colder development temperature, and that seems to help also. BTW, I have no idea how this film was stored for the past 30 years, but it was a full 100 sheet box.



 

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