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  1. #1

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    Overdeveloped or overexposed? Tri-x400/ D-76

    Hello. Im quite new to developing myself and i cant get my head around this one!

    I developed three rolls of tri x 400 yesterday. They came out really really bright!

    Heres two examples (one from each roll, developed differently)
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Im 99% sure my cameras expose right. Ive shot these pictures with two different Olympus Om2.
    I did manage to "save" them by reducing light and contrast in the scanning process.

    Example:
    Click image for larger version. 

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    They look really bad and boring but i do get the details out? Isnt that a sign of overdeveloping. Shouldnt it be all burnt out if it was overexposed?

    Now to my real question!
    I developed two rolls in stock d76 solution for 6.45 seconds, stop for 1 min and 10 min of fix. I saw the big failure and did my next roll with 1:1 solution, exactly 21 celcius for 9 min (as the charts say). 1 min stop and again 10 min fix. Same bad result!!

    Ive heard about bleaching the negs back and i am thinking of doing it at a photo shop to save my pictures but i really wanna develop by myself but i dont get what i do wrong here?

    I use 1 bag of d76 (for one liter). Stir it in the right temperture in 800ml water, then the 200ml rest like it says. I use citrin stop diluted 1:19 as it says and Illford Rapid fixer diluted 1:4 as it says.

    Hope someone can help me here!
    Regards
    Johan (Sweden)
    Last edited by Joper08; 04-01-2012 at 12:54 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #2
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Hello Johan, and welcome to APUG.

    In order to answer your question, we need to know more about the negatives themselves, rather than any scans you may have of them.

    How do they look? Are the thicker parts of the negatives at least partially transparent? Can you see detail in the thinner (shadow) parts?

    I don't know if you have seen this site that deals with assessing negatives, but I find it helpful: http://www.ephotozine.com/article/as...negatives-4682

    One old-timer's trick was to try to read text through
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #3
    fotch's Avatar
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    Hello Johan and welcome to APUG.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  4. #4

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    Thanks for the answers! I just found out my mistake tho.

    The company i ordered the developer from sent me paper developer instead of film! The bags look quite the same so i can understand their mistake. I have never used d76 developer so i didnt even think that it could be for paper (even tho it says "paper" in the right corner ) but i didnt take notice to it and assumed i had gotten the things i ordered!

    Feels good to know the mistake even tho my negs are ruined. I got really confused thought maby my thermometer had gone crazy.

    Regards
    Johan

  5. #5
    jp498's Avatar
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    I bet the negatives are still scannable or printable.

  6. #6

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    if you've got multicontrast paper, might be able to save them by using a really low contrast filter in the enlarger. Just a suggestion, but if you're pulling detail out of the highlights in the scan, I think you could work a bit of darkroom magic on them and get pretty decent prints out of them after some trial and error
    "I have captured the light and arrested its flight! The sun itself shall draw my pictures!"

    -Louis Daguerre, 1839-

  7. #7
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    You have pretty normal looking shadow detail, which means you didn't over-expose them.

    The negatives are over-developed, verified by the extremely high density in the highlights.

    Dektol isn't necessarily a bad film developer. You just have to watch it carefully so you don't over-develop. Try different shorter developing times, and I'm sure you will find a good compromise.
    It is grainier than D76 for sure, but with modern films that could be a benefit.

    - Thomas



    Quote Originally Posted by Joper08 View Post
    Hello. Im quite new to developing myself and i cant get my head around this one!

    I developed three rolls of tri x 400 yesterday. They came out really really bright!

    Heres two examples (one from each roll, developed differently)


    Im 99% sure my cameras expose right. Ive shot these pictures with two different Olympus Om2.
    I did manage to "save" them by reducing light and contrast in the scanning process.

    Example:


    They look really bad and boring but i do get the details out? Isnt that a sign of overdeveloping. Shouldnt it be all burnt out if it was overexposed?

    Now to my real question!
    I developed two rolls in stock d76 solution for 6.45 seconds, stop for 1 min and 10 min of fix. I saw the big failure and did my next roll with 1:1 solution, exactly 21 celcius for 9 min (as the charts say). 1 min stop and again 10 min fix. Same bad result!!

    Ive heard about bleaching the negs back and i am thinking of doing it at a photo shop to save my pictures but i really wanna develop by myself but i dont get what i do wrong here?

    I use 1 bag of d76 (for one liter). Stir it in the right temperture in 800ml water, then the 200ml rest like it says. I use citrin stop diluted 1:19 as it says and Illford Rapid fixer diluted 1:4 as it says.

    Hope someone can help me here!
    Regards
    Johan (Sweden)
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  8. #8

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    Just print them "high-key".



 

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