Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,464   Posts: 1,570,668   Online: 781
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21
  1. #1
    EASmithV's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Maryland
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,877
    Blog Entries
    4
    Images
    123

    Making your own glow film?

    Hello,

    I was wondering if anyone has tried washing off the antihalation dye in a 35mm or MF film prior to shooting it to give it a good glow effect?

    The easiest way to do this would be to shoot some Aura IR820 without a filter, but that's a bit more expensive for a film with kinda unreliable effects, if you're not using it for IR.

    So, has anyone tried / how easy would it be to do a pre-wash for a roll of film, and have it dry in the film tank?

    I've had film tanks where the light trap was on and they didn't dry for weeks... So Does anyone have an idea for doing this effectively? How about taking a Paterson tank and a hair dryer and forcing hot air through it's center hole?
    www.EASmithV.com

    "The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera."— Dorothea Lange
    http://www.flickr.com/easmithv/
    RIP Kodachrome

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Switzerland
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    376
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    28
    That's an interesting thought. I wouldn't do the hairdryer method, you'll get more dust than silver on your film. I guess the best way to dry them would be in a dark room, or perhaps in a cotton changing bag supported by some sort of improvised drying rack.
    And the sign said, "long haired freaky people need not apply"

  3. #3
    Terry Christian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Memphis, TN
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    589
    Images
    17
    I've heard of using a portable closet as a film drying rack. So I'm wondering, how about taking a black garment bag, the kind that's used for suits, and using that to hang the film to dry once you've rinsed off the antihalation layer? Of course, once you hang the film in the garment bag, you'd have to seal off the hanger slot and any other places light could leak in. I'd also worry about the wet film sticking to the inside of the bag, but maybe using an extra thick hanger and weighting the end of the film would help.

  4. #4
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Monroe, WA, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,567
    Images
    48
    If you have access to a sheet film camera for testing it might be easier to try it using a single sheet. I would think that a short immersion in a dilute sulfite solution followed by a water wash (and careful handling) should do the trick. Then perhaps drying in an old paper safe so the lights can be turned on. If the sulfite solution becomes tinted you should be good.

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  5. #5
    donkee's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Mid Michigan USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    147
    For 35mm try some Polypan F. I just started playing with it and notice the glow.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southern USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,055
    How do you propose to wash out any antihalation dyes but leave the sensitising dyes untouched? If the film uses an antihalation film base -- this dyd cannot be washed out.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  7. #7
    erikg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    pawtucket rhode island usa
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,428
    Quite a lot of dye comes out in a presoak with no harm so no reason you couldn't do that preexposure. drying part is the trick. Hanging would be best, maybe in a closet? That polypan is a good option too, rather glowy already.

  8. #8
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    NYC
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,002
    Lots of older films do not have the anti-halation layer. Some from eastern europe and china have minimal coatings. You can probably get the glow effect with any film if the pressure plate or backing was more reflective. You can try covering the plate with a shiny material and expose regularly. Aluminum tape comes to mind if you have a spare camera or back/plate combo to test with.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Washington DC area
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    596
    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    How do you propose to wash out any antihalation dyes but leave the sensitising dyes untouched? If the film uses an antihalation film base -- this dyd cannot be washed out.
    can you remove the sensitizing dyes just by washing?

    this could be interesting...I have always wanted to use a film that only had the sensitivity to UV & blue

    I have a large drum for processing prints...could easily leave a reel of film in there & let it dry...

  10. #10
    dehk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    W Michigan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    888
    Why? just get some Lucky SHD 100.
    - Derek
    [ Insert meaningless camera listing here ]

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin