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  1. #1

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    negatives coming out totally transparent

    Hi! I'm new to this. I just started developing 35mm film two weeks ago - using ID-11, water stop, and Ilford Rapid Fixer. The first litre of ID-11 produced decent photos (for a first round!). Then I used Ornano St-18 developer and Ornano F 205 fixer, with a water bath. Still decent results. This week, my next order of ID-11 came in, but now twice it has produced totally blank negatives.
    the second time it happened, I tested the ID-11 and it turns the leader of the film black - so I assume that's good.

    The first roll was a PanF 50 following Ilfords package recommendations for development and fixing time.
    The second roll was an HP5 400 following package recommendations for development and fixing.

    Reading the forums, the result looks as if the film had been fixed before developing. It is transparent with no edge numbers whatsoever. There is no evidence of any image and the film itself is greyish blue transparent - see through. It is impossible, however, that I dumped the fixer in first. I don't even uncap that until I'm doing the stop bath.
    Both times, however, I used the developer within 10 minutes of having mixed it up. Is it possible that the ID-11 hadn't properly "mixed" or "bound" or something before I used it? Should I have let it sit for an hour or so first?

    Anyway - any advice on this would sure be appreciated! Thanks in advance!
    Pete Cullen

  2. #2
    cliveh's Avatar
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    If you have no edge numbers you must have put fix in before developer.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  3. #3

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    No edge markings means you fixed instead of developed first, no matter how you look at it. Maybe you mixed up the bottles? Mistakes like that happen to everyone once in a blue moon.
    And the sign said, "long haired freaky people need not apply"

  4. #4

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    What the other two have said. Save yourself time and frustration of trying to think up other possible explanations and spend the time devising a foolproof method of not using fixer first e.g. mix only dev then use the water stop and when satisfied that the dev has been stopped then and only then mix the fixer to use. Whatever you are doing clearly allows you to reach for the fixer first.

    I did this once as well but of course I swear that I never touched the fixer first and poured it into the tank.

    pentaxuser

  5. #5
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Just before pouring in, pinch the liquid between your finger and thumb, if it feels slippery you have developer. If it feels clean and crisp it's stop or fix.

  6. #6
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Burk View Post
    Just before pouring in, pinch the liquid between your finger and thumb, if it feels slippery you have developer. If it feels clean and crisp it's stop or fix.
    Thats exactly what I do too when I am not sure on bottles I didnt label.

  7. #7
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser View Post
    Save yourself time and frustration of trying to think up other possible explanations and spend the time devising a foolproof method of not using fixer first.
    I think everybody does this once. Then they vow never to do it again.

    My trick for never doing it again is to use separate, marked containers for each chemical.
    I went to Walmart and bought four glass, four-cup measuring cups. They are approx. $6 apiece.
    I used a Pentel paint marker to write "Dev." "Stop" "Fix" and "HCA" on the bottom of each cup so that you can read it through the bottom even when there is liquid in the cup.
    These are the only cups I use to hold my chems and holding chems is the only thing I use these cups for.
    (No, I don't use the markings on the cups to actually measure. I have graduated beakers for that.)

    I always line my chemistry up, in order, from left to right DEV >> STOP >> FIX >> HCA and I always set each cup in the same place on my sink.
    I never vary from my routine. I've done it this way for so long, it's just a habit to pick up the right cup at the right time.
    Further with the name of the chem written right on the cup, it's hard to pour in the wrong one unless you're asleep. The label is staring you right in the face as you pour.

    Another benefit is that the handled measuring cups are easy to pick up and pour.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  8. #8
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Burk View Post
    Just before pouring in, pinch the liquid between your finger and thumb, if it feels slippery you have developer. If it feels clean and crisp it's stop or fix.
    Bill;

    If it is a neutral or alkaline fix, and depending on formula, this may not apply. These fixes will feel somewhat slippery too. There is no definitive test for these as there are too many possible formulas.

    PE

  9. #9

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    Usually fixers have a definite odor while developers do not. When in doubt give it the sniff test. Perhaps the best idea is to label everything before you start.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  10. #10

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    I'm just going to throw this out there too...

    Are you sure your camera is exposing the film still?

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