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  1. #31
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RonaldD View Post
    Another new term Wetting Agents,
    what are they and are they needed?

    Wetting agents for film are functionally similar to the "Jet Dry" liquid you use in your dishwasher to keep water spots off your dishes.

    Water spots on film can leave visible marks on your final prints that can spoil your image. Using a high grade surfactant in your final rinse makes the water run off cleanly instead of beading up and causing spots.

    PhotoFlo 200 is a common wetting agent for film. You mix it up, per the instructions (200 to 1) with clean water then you dunk your film in it for 30 seconds before you hang it up to dry. Just like "Jet Dry" PhotoFlo prevents water spots from forming on your film as they dry.

    While virtually everybody would tell you to use a wetting agent for your film, there are different schools of though as to how to proceed.
    Some will tell you to just gently shake the film to get the water off then hang up to dry. Others recommend using a sponge, a chamois or a specially made squeegee to wipe exess water off the film first.
    My personal method is to attach one end of the film to my clothes line with a film clip then I pull the free end until the film is taut and run my finger over the film to wipe away the water. If you do this method, first make sure your hands are percectly clean and dip a finger in the PhotoFlo before touching the film. Be careful not to use too much pressure lest you scratch the film.

    Wetting agents can form an invisible film that builds up on your containers and utensils. Be sure to wash your equipment well with hot water before putting it away to dry.
    Some folks recommend an occasional trip through the dishwasher to keep your equipment clean. (Top rack only.) Personally, I don't do that. I just rinse them in a tub of water then rinse under the hot water faucet, shake off the excess then put them in the drying rack.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  2. #32
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I too would recommend a non-hardening Rapid Fixer over Kodak regular fixer, unless shipping complexities make it a problem.

    I would recommend the Kodak and Ilford Rapid Fixers equally, except the Kodak version is only sold with the hardener, and that little bottle of hardener:

    a) is a concentrated (read strong) bottle of a highly acidic liquid; and
    b) that little bottle of hardener makes it harder to ship the entire package.

    You won't need, and probably won't want hardener with Kodak, Ilford or Fuji films.

    Unlike Randy, I don't squeegee films when I hang them to dry. We have very soft water here though.

    The links I referred to earlier, and the Horenstein book I referenced, will all answer many if not all of your questions.

    Have fun! I have, since I was 11 years old.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #33

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    The Horenstein Book is definitely guetting puchased.
    About the Ap universal tank that holds two 35mm or one 120.
    Since I will be finishing only one roll of 35mm at the time and the tank holds two and ( it has to be filled to the top)?
    does it mean that I will be using twice the amount that I actually need for the roll?
    Ronald

  4. #34
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RonaldD View Post
    The Horenstein Book is definitely guetting puchased.
    About the Ap universal tank that holds two 35mm or one 120.
    Since I will be finishing only one roll of 35mm at the time and the tank holds two and ( it has to be filled to the top)?
    does it mean that I will be using twice the amount that I actually need for the roll?
    Ronald
    The bottom of the tank has figures for how much solution to use with what films (to ensure they are covered by the solution).

    It has the numbers for 1 roll of 35mm or 126 film (375 ml), 2 rolls of 35mm or 126 film (650 ml), 1 roll of 120 or 220 film (590 ml) and 1 roll of 127 film (460 ml).

    Some times you need to use a bit more solution if you are using very dilute chemistry, but generally these numbers will do.

    And you may find that you surprise yourself - the ability to develop two rolls at once is very handy.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  5. #35

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    Thanks Matt,
    Ron

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    The bottom of the tank has figures for how much solution to use with what films (to ensure they are covered by the solution).

    It has the numbers for 1 roll of 35mm or 126 film (375 ml), 2 rolls of 35mm or 126 film (650 ml), 1 roll of 120 or 220 film (590 ml) and 1 roll of 127 film (460 ml).
    Some folks put the empty reel in the top position when they are running one roll just to make sure the reel with the film stays in place. The full reel goes in the bottom of course.
    Charles MacDonald
    aa508@ncf.ca
    I still live just beyond the fringe in Stittsville

  7. #37
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmacd123 View Post
    Some folks put the empty reel in the top position when they are running one roll just to make sure the reel with the film stays in place. The full reel goes in the bottom of course.
    Mine came with a clip that holds the bottom reel at the bottom when it is alone in the tank.

    Surprisingly, I still have that clip!
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  8. #38
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    For what it is worth, re wetting agent, I use Sprint End Run and am quite thrilled
    Andy

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Mine came with a clip that holds the bottom reel at the bottom when it is alone in the tank.

    Surprisingly, I still have that clip!
    I have made reel spacers using black 35mm film canisters, its easy, holds the single reel at the bottom well, and its one less reel to wash if you do not have those neat clips.

    To make, all you have to do is take a old canister, black preferably, (but honestly the clear ones don't match as well lol), stick one reel on the center light blocking column, put the canister on top of the reel, against the column, and use the top of the column as a guide to score the can with a knife. then take off the can and use your knife to cut along the score line, and be sure to remove and sharp surfaces or hanging plastic burrs either with the knife, or by sanding lightly.

    You will end up with a open ended tube that you can put on between the bottom reel, and the top of the locking film developing canister, which effectively locks the bottom reel against sliding up. Works well for medium format as well with a smaller spacer.

    I have included pics to make this clearer.
    Click image for larger version. 

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