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Thread: Lith printing?

  1. #11

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    I don't know how you are calculating correct exposure. It is my understanding that one gives at least three times the exposure for lith printing that one does for conventional silver printing. That may give you the results that you want.


    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    I had a chance to try it again today.

    1st print I forget to prewash the paper. Went straight into the developer before I remembered it. Pulled it out after a few seconds and soaked it. Then into the developer again. I don't know if the print was underdeveloped or if the developer is too weak now. I'm leaning towards weak developer. 15 + minutes in the developer.

    With me screwing up the first print I exposed a second while I was developing the first. When I went to pull it off the easel I noticed it was on top of the blades not under. @$#$@. Prewash then into the developer. Nothing. For almost 30 minutes. I think I put the paper on the easel upside down. @#$#$@#. It finally came up but was very light.

    While this was going on I exposed a third sheet. Gave it an extra stop of exposure. With 20+ minutes in the developer it wasn't any darker then the first print.

    I'm going to dump half the developer and replace it.

    Well at this rate a box of paper will last the all of next year-)

  2. #12

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    The first few had three stops extra over what my normal developer would want. The last one I added one more stop. I've looked at the dry prints and I think they got pulled a little early. OTOH it still looks like the developer is close to dead.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    I've been using Kodak D-9 developer
    that I mixed myself.
    Do you know what Kodak had in mind when they compounded
    D-9? D-9 has a Bunch of bromide. Wall's has Zero.

    A thread I started a few days ago may be of interest; Wall's Normal
    Hydroquinone. It has all the same ingredients of a print developer
    with which I was experimenting. To my surprise my concoction
    produced in eight minutes a fine, very warm tone lith print on
    Arista 5x7 RC.

    Wall's is a lith developer stripped to the bare essentials;
    hydroquinone, sulfite, and carbonate. I hope to compare it
    to my formulation in the near future. Dan

  4. #14

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    The stock solution has a lot of bromide. But I'm using it 1:1:8. That brings the bromide level down quite a bit. With fresh developer the stuff was too fast even at that dilution. When I've replenished all I've added is more hydroquine and sodium hydroxide. I figure the paper is releasing bromide into the old part of the developer.

    The sulfite is mostly for peppering? I had some peppering with the first few sheets but that went away when the developer aged.

  5. #15

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    IIRC at 1:1:8 working strength will have 2.25 grams bromide/liter. That is well
    above most paper developers at working strength and way above 0. You've
    the chemistry, why not try a quarter batch or Wall's? Sulfite, carbonate,
    hydroquinone, that's all there is to it. Dan

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    The stock solution has a lot of bromide.
    But I'm using it 1:1:8. That brings the bromide level down quite a bit.
    With fresh developer the stuff was too fast even at that dilution.
    When I've replenished all I've added is more hydroquine and
    sodium hydroxide. I figure the paper is releasing bromide
    into the old partof the developer.

    The sulfite is mostly for peppering? I had some peppering with the
    first few sheets but that went away when the developer aged.
    I've checked quite a few formulas. High bromide levels are associated
    with hydroxide. Formulas without hydroxide have low bromide levels or
    none at all; ie Wall's Normal Hydroqinone.

    From what little I know of lith printing I'd say the sulfite acts as
    a preservative. The "peppering" is likely due to overly great local
    infectious development caused by low local sulfite levels and/or
    the highly active nature of the developer. Is D-9 recommended
    for lith print processing? Dan

  7. #17

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    D-9 is on the unblinkingeye.com webpage. So I assume it's okay for lith. I don't have Rudman's book at my finger tips but from memory he mentions that sulfite was a two edge sword. Too much lowered lith effects. Too little risked peppering. Some papers will show peppering more then others supposedly. I saw no peppering with Forte but early on saw a little with the Agfa.

    http://unblinkingeye.com/Articles/LithDev/lithdev.html

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    D-9 is on the unblinkingeye.com webpage.
    So I assume it's okay for lith. I don't have Rudman's book at my
    finger tips but from memory he mentions that sulfite was a two
    edge sword. Too much lowered lith effects. Too little risked
    peppering. Some papers will show peppering more then
    others supposedly. I saw no peppering with Forte but
    early on saw a little with the Agfa.

    http://unblinkingeye.com/Articles/LithDev/lithdev.html
    You'll also find another bunch of lith formulas by searching
    Google for, wall's normal hydroquinone .

    AFAIK, all lith formulas save for, I believe, a very few and
    recent print specific formulas, were compounded for film. I
    dare say some were formulated 70, 80, 90, 100 or more
    years ago. Films of what character, who knows. Dan

  9. #19

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    Lith developer is designed for lith film. The stuff is used in the printing industry I think. The combination will provided very high contrast negatives. Freestyle sells lith film. It's relatively cheap LF sheet film. The problem is the contrast needs to be tamed.

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