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  1. #11
    BrendanCarlson's Avatar
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    I know I don't need it... I just figure it doesn't hurt and it helps to get the temp set. Idk, did it the first time and have ever since.
    Everybody has a photographic memory, some just don't have film.
    My Website and Gallery is at www.bcarlsonmedia.com
    My Twitter is @brendancarlson

  2. #12
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Here's a simple suggestion that's easy to remember:

    • 1 min. prewash. (Optional.)
    • Develop for recommended time per the manufacturer's specs.
    • Stop bath for 30 sec. or 3 times fill/dump with clear water. (Your choice.)
    • Fixer for 5 to 10 minutes, depending on the type of chemistry used and the type of film used.
    • Clear water wash. Fill/dump 3 times.
    • Hypo clearing agent for the same amount of time you used for your fixer.
    • Wash in slowly running water for 15 to 30 minutes.
    • Photo-Flo then hang to dry.

    There are some variables but most of them are non-critical except for the developing time. That, you have to get right. Do check your developing charts and follow them closely.

    As I mentioned, my suggestions are for a simplified process that's easy to remember. It's not perfect but it will get the job done.
    After you get the hang of things, you should start looking at your process to find ways to improve.

    You don't need to follow the manufacturer's specs for developing times to the letter. You are probably going to want to vary that time, at some point, in order to get better results.
    Fixing time is not set in stone, either. You might not need to fix for a full five minutes. It's possible that you might need more than ten minutes but you shouldn't go much longer than that. Too much fixer can be bad for the film. Not enough fixer will definitely be bad for your film. Five minutes ought to be long enough but it's hard to say, exactly, without knowing a few things.

    There is a way to test your film and fixer combination in order to tell exactly how long you need to fix but, for now just go five minutes. If you need to, you can fix for as long as ten.
    You can learn the test later. For now, just do it for a set time.

    You probably don't need to use Hypo Clear for a long time but, just to make it easy to remember, do it for the same time you used the fixer.
    Each manufacturer has their own recommendations for the time needed for Hypo Clear. Just read the instructions on the package.

    For now, just learn the basic process. Once you get used to it, you can fine tune.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

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    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  3. #13
    FNH
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    Alright, noted.
    In addition to skipping Lunch to develop, I might need to skip French to get it all done too..
    Its good to know I don't need to follow the directions to the second. I assumed every measurement had to be incredibly minute.

  4. #14
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FNH View Post
    Alright, noted.
    In addition to skipping Lunch to develop, I might need to skip French to get it all done too..
    Its good to know I don't need to follow the directions to the second. I assumed every measurement had to be incredibly minute.
    Measurements don't have to be 100% accurate. But, you should try to be consistent in how you're inaccurate, of that makes sense. Basically, do it the same way every time, except for the amount of time the film is in the developer, which changes based on film and developer.

    Good luck! And have fun skipping French.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  5. #15
    FNH
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    How I was going to go about it, tweak one variable each time and see how it goes. Keep the tweak if its for the better, or revert back if not.

  6. #16
    FNH
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    Sorry to bring back this thread, but I spoke to the photography teacher... All I remember hearing about the developer was that it was Something twenty and that 400 speed was developed for 12 and a half minutes. This doesn't sound very right to me from what I have read.

    Could it be that it's ilford?

  7. #17

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    FNH,
    This might be useful to you. It's a chart of developing times for TMAX 400 according to developer and dilution:

    http://www.digitaltruth.com/devchart...er=&mdc=Search

  8. #18
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FNH View Post
    Sorry to bring back this thread, but I spoke to the photography teacher... All I remember hearing about the developer was that it was Something twenty and that 400 speed was developed for 12 and a half minutes. This doesn't sound very right to me from what I have read.

    Could it be that it's ilford?
    I think your teacher is just trying to keep it simple and avoid too many technical questions up front. It's more important to learn just the mechanics of it early on, and it isn't really until you start printing that you can truly see a difference in how your negatives are developed anyway.

    I'm sure that in time you will hear how developing time alters contrast and agitation alters tonality. And even if you don't, there are a lot of other aspects of photography that are infinitely more important than developing film. Don't get me wrong, it's important, but most beginners lack the context of how to capitalize fully on film developing technique anyway, that it may be premature to try to be a really good darkroom technician before understanding the basics.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  9. #19
    FNH
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    I think it may be more beneficial for me to develop my own film at home and enlarge there.
    I went to develop my film... and the developer looks scummy. Thing is, that the room is used by kids who DGAF about photography...

    Forgot to ask, recommended developer?
    Last edited by FNH; 05-12-2012 at 11:44 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #20

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    Everybody has his/her preferred developer for TMAX. You can use the Kodak developer made to go with it, or you can use something else. I personally use HC-110, and I'm happy with it. I use dilution H and develop for approximately 12 minutes at ASA 320.

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