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  1. #21

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    You must have A LOT of spare time -- most of your times are too long. For example, a few seconds dip in diluted Photo-Flo is enough. Read the manufacturer's time for fixing. Too long in rapid fixer can actually bleach negatives and prints and extend washing times.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 05-12-2012 at 06:25 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  2. #22

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    Since you are using a Kodak film read the following instructions from Kodak. Accept no substitutes.

    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...dbwf/edbwf.pdf

    BTw, both Kodak and Ilford do not recommend pre-soaking their films.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 05-12-2012 at 09:09 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by FNH View Post
    I think it may be more beneficial for me to develop my own film at home and enlarge there.
    I went to develop my film... and the developer looks scummy. Thing is, that the room is used by kids who DGAF about photography...

    Forgot to ask, recommended developer?
    That's a good point; school chemicals can be contaminated with anything you can imagine (and probably some things you can't!). At my college I watched someone drain their tank of fixer, then plonk it straight into the wetting agent I was about to use! You're best strategy is to buy your own chemicals and dev at home. At least you'll be the only one using them!

    You'll probably get hundreds of developers suggested here; I like Ilford ID-11, which is the same as Kodak D-76 because it's reliable, gives fine grain results, inexpensive and keeps well. I'm sure all the rest are just as good. Whatever you buy, be sure to store it in airtight containers (I use de-labelled plastic drinks bottles) so it doesn't deteriorate before you need it.

    Pre-soaking softens the gelatin ready to accept the developer, warms the tank and stops tiny air bubbles from forming on the film's surface. I find it works for me; others here hold different and equally valid opinions. There's no need to worry unless you start seeing tiny white 'pinprick' holes in your negatives (unexplained black spots on prints). Find what works for you and stick with it - there's plenty of time to experiment later.

    Cheers,
    kevs
    Last edited by kevs; 05-13-2012 at 03:19 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: presoak
    testing...

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