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  1. #31

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    Again, I'd say your printing is likely tuned to how you make your negatives, which is where we end up through practice. In the end as long as you come away with the print you want it's all good.

  2. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    When you say 4 clicks, do you mean 4 full stops or is each "click" 1/3 or 1/2 stop? Most current spot meters read in 1/3 stop increments but I wanted to ask you to check this. It makes a big difference. If the brightness range in the scene is 4 stops, a combination of relatively mild extended development, and a higher paper grade can help. If you placed your average on zone V and we assume the range was 4 stops around that, you're basically exposing to put the low values on around zone III, and the high values on zone VII. In this case, a mild extended development could increase the zone VII density a little (without too much increased grain) and you could use a slightly higher filter when printing on MG paper. You might also decide to leave development alone and just use higher contrast in printing. I would not decrease exposure in this case. In fact I might increase exposure a little, to make sure the entire range is on the straight line part of the film's characteristic curve. This will ensure the total contrast is maximized even before you think about development.

    If, on the other hand, each "click" is 1/2 stop or 1/3 stop, the scene is very low in contrast. This would mean if you placed your average on zone V, the range might be only from Zone IV to zone VI, or even less. In a case like that, extended development is not going to do nearly as much to increase contrast, but will still increase graininess substantially (which may or may not be acceptable to you aesthetically depending on film size and print size). In such a case, assuming you use HP5+, if you really want more contrast it is going to come down pretty much entirely to printing - using higher contrast filters - and burning and dodging etc to expand the tonal range. These are powerful tools. In this case, as in the scenario above, again I would advise not to reduce exposure. If the scene is extremely low in contrast, placing the average on zone V is fine. As in the scenario above, underexposing will not help you, and if anything would likely result in decreased contrast.
    Hi Michael,

    Sorry if I didn't make that clear. What I meant was that each "click" was one full stop. So my 4 click range covered zone III to VII. Using an old Rolleiflex TLR means I only deal in whole numbers so don't have the added complication of 1/3rd stops ! When a reading falls between two, I generally will over exposure rather than under. Reading everyone's posts I think my initial confusion came about by not fully understanding the way people will meter differently when using a spot meter compared with one in camera. Thanks for taking the time to reply.

  3. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Burk View Post
    Hi Guy,

    In the gallery are some shots I took in flat lighting on a weekend at Russian River (but not at the secret Bohemian Grove conclave).

    I developed the film longer than "normal" because I knew the film I shot was under flat lighting. As a result, the film which normally has a 32 speed, came closer to 40 speed.

    I could have underexposed by a stop.

    When making prints I had to print this on Grade 3 1/2. If I had developed normally, it would possibly have needed Grade 4 or more.

    I enjoy printing a negative that fits between Grade 2 and 3. When working with higher grades of paper, I feel like I have to work with a higher degree of accuracy because exposure times, burning and dodging are more sensitive to changes.

    So to echo what others have said... Underexpose if you wish (but probably not necessary). Develop longer than normal if you wish (but if you use higher contrast paper, even this is not necessary).
    Hi Bill,

    Thanks for this post. Great images ! Good tip about about higher grades of paper being more sensitive to burning and dodging, I wasn't aware of this.

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