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View Poll Results: I will be able to buy FB paper for the next X years.

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  • 1-5 years

    5 3.76%
  • 6-11 years

    15 11.28%
  • 12-20 years

    33 24.81%
  • forever

    80 60.15%
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Results 21 to 30 of 38
  1. #21
    Sjixxxy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Craig Koshyk
    I recently heard a couple of digi-dudes discussing the "fact" that all analog materials will soon go the way of the buggy whip.

    So I googled "buggy whip" and found this interesting tidbit

    http://www.findarticles.com/p/articl...29/ai_14176369

    IMHO black and white materials from film to paper will be around as long as buggy whips...and the companies that learn how sell these materials in a niche market will do quite well.
    Yeah, I feel there will alway be someone making it, even if it is in really small quantities and/or more expesive then what we have today. Yesterday I was reading into absinthe. Even though it was banned in most countries worldwide about 100 years ago, there are still a few distilleries making it, and it cost a lot more then it did in its heyday. If a beverage can have government bans galore, and a few companies still manufacturer it to serve the niche market, I don't think it much threat to B&W papers. I believe the niche market would be much bigger, and I don't see any banning of it in the future. Unless of course, the digiheads start to get really scared of it, make up some bogus excuse and start a b&w traditional temperance movement.
    Gear: Camera, Brain, Light.
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  2. #22

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    I agree with Bruce's comments about 1000%.

    I'm reminded of a story I heard some 25 years ago. A photo teacher of my acquaintance had returned from New Orleans and he had spent some time with Clarence John Laughlin, one of the great photographers of his era. Laughlin was livid because all the good photo mounting tissue had been discontinued. He called what was available "styrofoam" and so despised it he said he wouldn't use it. He was asking his guest if he could make some contacts to locate supplies of "real" mounting tissue.

    Not being a connoisseur of mounting tissue, I took this for an eccentricity. While I now realize it was part of his perfectionism, I think we may be over-reacting to the inevitability of changes. Laughlin could still mount his photographs, after all. I think we will still be able to take our pictures and print our negatives, even if we somehow figure out how to become immortal. We may complain about no longer having Tri-X, Pan F, Ilford MG or Forte Polywarmtone, but somebody will still be out there making materials we can use. It may be "styrofoam" compared to what we used previously, but something will still be available.

  3. #23

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    Forever. The digital camera bubble will burst. Maybe not soon, but in time. People will go back to film and us artists are going continue to create in the darkroom. There is going to be a renaissance era where doing the darkroom is going to be a fad...Ebay will be hit hard and it will be a sellers market. Most of the followers will go back to digital, but some will stay and continue to work the darkroom magic.

    Its a pendulum that keeps swinging....
    David Savkovic

    My home page

  4. #24
    Laurent's Avatar
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    have to disagree there...

    Quote Originally Posted by rbarker
    Everything will cease to be available when the world ends in about 8 years - 2012, as foretold by the Mayan calendar.
    If Lagavullin is to be discontinued this year, then it's the indication of the world moving to an end... :o
    Laurent

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    Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast (Oscar Wilde)

    My APUG Blog

  5. #25
    fhovie's Avatar
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    I agree

    I just wonder about this generation who will loose their photographic history in a hard drive crash and the CD back up that was left in a window sill no longer reads.

    All the color photos my family took 30 years ago look bad and the B&W ones look good. People ask me to do portraits - I tell them I will only do them in B&W - They now state that is their preference - If they want color - they can go to Walmart. My friend that owns a minilab is going out of business in a week. I will have no more access to color myself. It was fun but for that, I will start using a lab on the net that uses drum scanners and a laserjet printer.

    I still do alt processes - cyanotypes, kalitypes ... If the materials are around for that - we will always be able to get B&W paper - we can even still get AZO and Amidol (still my favorite) - There will be fewer choices - 2 or 3 brands maybe. I am now playing with TMAX film - I always steered away from that one in the past - It is actually not bad - a very different look though - I really notice the difference in tonal rendition - I think I'll keep both TMAX and traditional emulsions on hand - as long as I have a choice.. I just hate paying the specialty prices we will probably need to endure.

  6. #26
    Stan. L-B's Avatar
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    Well said Bruce. Perhaps when the penny drops about the limited life of digital generally, there will be a massive reversal of the digital hype!
    'Determine on some course more than a wild exposure to each chance' The Bard.

  7. #27
    CBG
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    Quote Originally Posted by g0tr00t
    Forever. ....
    A contrarian view:

    We are in the best - not the worst - time for analog photography - ever.

    We have an incredible array of film and cameras and optics - the best ever available - from revived old time films with properties like super double x... all the way to t-grain films.

    There's been what? 3? 4? generations of improved LF optics since I got my first convertible Symmar something like 30 years ago.

    Supplies and information are more accessible now than ever before - especially for alternative processes.

    We never before had the option to combine analog and digital processes. Enlarged negs for huge contact prints? Easier with digital output.

    Optics are better. Schneider has just come out with the XXL optics for ULF work. I would assume they are wonderful glass.

    Yes, many older items have become unavailable, but a lot of new items for fine arts photographers have come onto the market.

    When before has there been anything like the current availability of new high quality LF cameras? Never. Many of the brands I can buy now just didn't exist when I started photographing.

    I think the materials now available are a reflection of the greater interest in LF and alternative process work as artistic tools. Digital is clearly the winning choice on the quicker is better front. Film/analog gives more options when ultimate quality is the criteria.

    C

    Think about it.

    C

  8. #28
    arigram's Avatar
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    Now, that I think about it, the whole story of photography reminds me of the argentinian dance of tango.
    It was born of humble parents and it was not accepted in the high society.
    Until it was taken, bastardised and changed to fit the very different needs of people who did not know how to dance. Like dilluted wine.
    It was almost forgotten then out of sudden a new generation of dancers revived it and now it thrives again.
    aristotelis grammatikakis
    www.arigram.gr
    Real photographs, created in camera, 100% organic,
    no digital additives and shit




  9. #29

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    All we need is a solar flare that disrupts electronics for about 1 hour during a popular event. You will see the masses converting....
    David Savkovic

    My home page

  10. #30
    Sjixxxy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by g0tr00t
    All we need is a solar flare that disrupts electronics for about 1 hour during a popular event. You will see the masses converting....
    Or some nuclear weapondry with enough EMP to destroy every computer and digital camera on the planet.

    Or maybe not.
    Gear: Camera, Brain, Light.
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