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  1. #11
    Bertil's Avatar
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    Hi Jeff, yes it was a problem for me also several years. I think the problem is this: using ordinary small developing tanks and agitating by inversion of the tank, tend to make movements of the developer more vigorous around the edges of the film spiral, thus causing overdevelopment compared to the middle part of the film surface. If you agitate softly (say 1-2 inversions each half or full minute) you may be lucky and for most subjects get an acceptable result, but it's risky, particularly with even surfaces like clear skies and the like, since the exchange of fresh compared with used developing agents at the whole film surface is not optimal. Supposing that I don't have a full guarantee of even development across the whole film surface unless the exchange of fresh compared with used developing agents is optimal, I use the following method. I have always used stainless steal tanks for some reason, I use only one 120 spiral in a tank for 2 and I use only 500 ml developer; I inverse the tank during the first minute quite vigorous, also rotating it in various ways. Now it depends on emulsion developer and temperature how fast the developing process proceeds. I try to keep my total developing time somewhere between 6-10 minutes (or in rare cases even more). Agitating quite vigorously some 10-15 seconds each minute should give you no problems within 6-10 minutes total developing time, but normally I agitate quite vigorously 15-20 seconds each second or third minute (my standard is something like: 18-20°C temperature, 8-9 minutes D-76/Rodinal1+50 (TMY-2 Acros 100 i.e. 320/64), inversion first minute, 15-20 sec. the second, forth and sixth minutes.). In my experience with a total development time like 8-10 minutes it doesn't happen very much developing during the agitating period of 10-15 seconds, rather makes the exchange of fresh compared with used developing agents across the film surface very good, which is important. Due to surface tension with a liquid at a film surface, just slowly move the film in the liquid doesn’t make for a good exchange of fresh compared with used developing agents. Following this method/idea for agitation I have no more problem with uneven development from 135 film to 120, and 4x5", 5x7", 8x10" sheet film. I was quite released when I managed to get fully even results also on critical subject like skies and the like.
    Using a Peterson type developing tank where the developer goes into the “big mouth” of the tank when you inverse the tank perhaps makes it possible to put 2 120 film in a tank for 1 liter and get good results. Hate uneven development, so I don’t experiment with that! Rather have several tanks for two roll with just 1 roll in each, having cut a piece from a coca-cola bottle to keep the single roll in place in the tank when I inverse it.
    Best wishes
    /Bertil

  2. #12
    sandermarijn's Avatar
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    I second Bertil's words and would like to add some of my own trickery.

    Uneven development along the edges of 120 film is a tricky issue that I'm not sure I understand fully myself. Everybody seems to have their own recipe for success, and I am no different. Sometimes I fail as well, though only rarely now. My road to success:

    1. agitate at least the first 30 seconds (I do 45),
    2. make sure the tank is big enough to allow all developer to clear the film when the tank is fully inverted,
    3. use a bit more solution than what is indicated on the tank (e.g. 600 ml instead of 500 ml); this helps against air trapped under the top reel,
    4. tap the tank *lightly* after agitation (but first allow some time for the solution to settle, otherwise the film may kink) in order to release air bubbles that cling to the film,
    5. don't just invert the tank, also rotate (combine the two),
    6. avoid short developing times (<5 minutes).

    Quote Originally Posted by Bertil View Post
    Using a Peterson type developing tank where the developer goes into the “big mouth” of the tank when you inverse the tank perhaps makes it possible to put 2 120 film in a tank for 1 liter and get good results. Hate uneven development, so I don’t experiment with that! Rather have several tanks for two roll with just 1 roll in each, having cut a piece from a coca-cola bottle to keep the single roll in place in the tank when I inverse it.
    Two 120 films in a 1 litre tank is a no-no for me also, even with the large-head Patersons. I speak from experience .

    The coca-cola bottle solution against shifting of the reel up the column may be substituted by adding an empty reel on top of the reel containing the film. Or use the retaining rings Paterson used to supply with the older non-Super System 4 tanks (I don't know why they stopped including them in the Super 4 system- shame).

    Sander

  3. #13
    Bertil's Avatar
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    Thanks Sander, I think we are on same track!
    Good you added the problemes with air bubbles, forgot that!
    And yes, I also think I normally use somewhat more solution than just above the film, I think I end up at 550, perhaps even 600 ml,
    Your formulation: "2. make sure the tank is big enough to allow all developer to clear the film when the tank is fully inverted," points to why filling up the tank with rolls of film will give you problems, the "up going" airbubbles that manufactures talk about when inverting the tank is just not enough!
    You also confirm my hesitaion about two rolls in 1 liter Paterson tank, even though it has a big mouth, but probably will not fulfill your point 2 which is most important.

    I can also add that the rotating drum Jobo system (like my CPE-2) gives overdeveloped edges on 120-film. I try to avoid that by regularly inverting the drum during the development process, and it seems to work well for my C-41 developing process.

    Best regards
    /Bertil

  4. #14
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Where in the US is tower bridge??
    “The photographer must determine how he wants the finished print to look before he exposes the negative.
    Before releasing the shutter, he must seek 'the flame of recognition,' a sense that the picture would reveal
    the greater mystery of things...more clearly than the eyes see."
    ~Edward Weston, 1922.

  5. #15
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Welcome to the land of 'Blad!
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  6. #16
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ted_smith View Post
    Thanks guys! I was staying at "The Tower Hotel" so tok the opportunity. The photos were taken from the south side of the river.

    It's a scan of the film conducted by the lab. They do a "standard" scan service for £4 a film, or a "high-res and corrected" scan for about £15 a film. This is a standard scan - the prints themselves look better still, as you can probably imagine! I don't know about the developer - I am afraid to say I don't develop my own medium format. I send them off to "The Darkroom UK" in Chelmsford, UK. You could always ask them direct - I'm sure they'd tell you. They seem to do a good job with my Fuji films.
    This page seems to give some hints about the developer they are using: http://www.the-darkroom.co.uk/frames/Abwfilm2010.html

    Looks like X-Tol or T-Max.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  7. #17

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    Where in the US is tower bridge??
    Didn't Maggie Thatcher sell it off and it is now outside some hotel in Las Vegas?

  8. #18

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    Apparently not. The urban legend that it was purchased in the '60s and set up in Arizona is just that - a legend. The developer in question actually bought the old London Bridge.

  9. #19

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    Apparently not. The urban legend that it was purchased in the '60s and set up in Arizona is just that - a legend. The developer in question actually bought the old London Bridge.
    I know I was really only joking.
    But, I think when they did buy London bridge they may have thought they were getting the nicer looking and more iconic Tower Bridge.

  10. #20

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    Robert Paxton McCulloch, of McCulloch Chainsaw fame. Interesting read...and his in-laws, too.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_P._McCulloch

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_...Havasu_City%29

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