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  1. #21

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    Baachitraka - Read Kodak's recommendations and procedures for replenishment here:

    http://wwwcaen.kodak.com/global/en/p...Pubs/o3/o3.pdf

    The discussion concerning replenishment begins on page 15 and includes a lot of clear information on how to do it, seasoning (speed loss etc), and the characteristics of replenished developers. XTOL is included.

    In fact I'd recommend reading that entire tech pub. Good reading at any experience level.

  2. #22

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    to you replenishing people, two questions:
    1. do you reckon the result is better than using stock or 1+1 solution?
    2. is it worth the while if one only develops say four or five films a month?
    Peter

  3. #23

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    It really depends on the developer. A replenished developer contains some development by-products (eg bromides) and exhausted developing agents. It is therefore a little less active than a fresh developer. Typically with modern general purpose solvent developers (such as XTOL), compared with a fresh developer, a replenished developer will give slightly lower film speed, and slightly lower contrast. Depending on the developer formulation and sensitivity to bromide, there can also be a *slight* increase in acutance due to slightly enhanced edge effects. That effect would likely only be visible in large print sizes. Remember though, these properties would be in comparison to undiluted fresh developer. There is no advantage to replenishment from an image quality perspective versus 1+1. Replenishment is mostly for economy and convenience.

    Again, I'd recommend reading Kodak publication O3 (posted above) for a good background on replenishment.

  4. #24
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    What I notice with replenished Xtol compared to Xtol 1:1 is a less linear film curve, meaning a change in tonality. The highlights compress due to lesser activity (the byproducts act like restrainers), and the shadows also compress a little at the toe. The difference isn't huge, but it's there, and for things like portraiture I've come to really appreciate the qualities of the negatives I make with the replenished developer. I also notice a slightly finer grain and some added sharpness, and in themselves they are not great differences, but together it helps to make Xtol look a little less sterile while still maintaining really good shadow detail.

    Replenished Xtol is also very reliable. I've had the same 2liter working solution alive for about three years now, without having to start a new batch. Just mix fresh developer to replenish with. In addition I've also interchangeably used the Eco Pro powder from Freestyle, with Kodak Xtol, and the results are identical.

    If you don't develop any film for a couple of weeks, replenish 70-100ml anyway. Keep doing this in two week intervals until you start running film again, and your developer stays active and stable.

    And, then of course, as Michael points out, the economy of only using 70ml of concentrate per film is hard to beat, and it's nice to use less chemicals per roll, purely from an environmental perspective. Michael is also correct that the difference between replenished Xtol and Xtol 1:1 isn't large enough to sweat over. It's a preference thing. But one really nice aspect of Xtol is that if you don't like it replenished, you can just use it straight or diluted as you please, at will, since the replenisher and the developer is the same substance.

    - Thomas
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  5. #25

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    That is definitely a convenient feature of XTOL - ie that it functions as its own replenisher.

    One thing I'd just remind everyone thinking about trying a replenished regime (this was mentioned earlier in the thread), is be aware of the developer's changing properties as you move from the initial fresh batch to a fully seasoned, replished steady state. This is something to be aware of since as the fresh batch becomes increasingly seasoned you will need to adjust your working EI and/or development times as you go. Again I'd refer to the Kodak publication for some good info on this.

  6. #26
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Thanks Michael for that link - I knew I had seen that information somewhere in the Kodak literature .
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    If you use your fixer for papers:
    http://www.kodak.com:80/global/en/pr...3cp/e103cp.pdf

    If you use your fixer for film:
    http://www.kodak.com:80/global/en/pr...3cf/e103cf.pdf

    Lots of info on the Kodak web site. You really should be looking this sort of information up before you ask. It takes less time than waiting for an answer here, and you learn other things as you look.
    Thanks Thomas, I did have this one, it says 100/26 under useful capacity. What does this mean? I just want to know whether I can re-use my fixer once, twice or three times before chucking it. I only need an approximate answer with a safe margin. Hope this make sense. Thanks again!
    Speed Graphic, Fuji GX680,Pentax 67, Mamiya RZ67, Mamiya 645 1000s, Nikon F5, Nikon Fm2

  8. #28
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 10speeduk View Post
    Thanks Thomas, I did have this one, it says 100/26 under useful capacity. What does this mean? I just want to know whether I can re-use my fixer once, twice or three times before chucking it. I only need an approximate answer with a safe margin. Hope this make sense. Thanks again!
    The figure you quote is for paper, and it means 100 8x10" sheets (or equivalent paper area) per gallon of fixer at working strength, or 26 of the same per liter.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  9. #29
    Athiril's Avatar
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    No need to start out with Xtol stock.. season it with E-6 First Developer Starter (it's not expensive). That is detailed in the Kodak Xtol PDF.

  10. #30
    baachitraka's Avatar
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    Just curious, how you guys compare with Divided D-23 and other variations with Xtol or repl Xtol?

    One problem is that I don't shoot that frequently to use 5l Xtol before it dies.
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

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