Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,280   Posts: 1,534,868   Online: 809
      
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 31 to 37 of 37
  1. #31
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,233
    Images
    296
    Quote Originally Posted by baachitraka View Post
    Just curious, how you guys compare with Divided D-23 and other variations with Xtol or repl Xtol?

    One problem is that I don't shoot that frequently to use 5l Xtol before it dies.
    I don't. I found something that works really well for me, so I don't try to fix what isn't broken.

    People make much too big of a deal of the developers and film they use. Maybe not what you want to hear, but no film or developer is going to make or break a photographic print. It doesn't matter that much. Just pick one that's likely to stick around for a while, and learn how to exploit it to your liking.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  2. #32
    baachitraka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bremen, Germany.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,325
    Its only me that is really unsettled with the choice of the developer for fast film(400 or faster).

    I am quite happy with Rodinal(1+50) for slow film(APX 100 and PanF+) + Adox MCP 310/312 paper with a condenser enlarger.

    Rodinal is little grainy for my taste with fast film even printing on (24x18cm). So, I am in quest to find something better(artistically it may have different meaning) than what Rodinal can deliver for fast film.
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

  3. #33
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,233
    Images
    296
    You might want to try Ilfotec DD-X. It has many of Xtol's virtues, but comes in smaller containers. It's a great developer. Kodak's TMax is very similar.

    Xtol is a bit unique in the fine grain it yields, and at the same time extracts so much shadow detail while yielding sharp negatives, especially diluted 1:1.

    How about this: Just use the developer straight or 1:1. After six months simply discard what you're not using.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  4. #34
    baachitraka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bremen, Germany.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,325
    Yeah, I will mix it soon. Its not so expensive even if I waste a litre or more than that.
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

  5. #35

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,617
    Baachitraka, one thing I'd always recommend to anyone thinking about a different developer is to ask yourself a series of specific questions, rather than searching vaguely for something "better" (very difficult to define - too many variables). Try to be logical. So for example, say you find Rodinal too grainy with 400 speed films. There are many developers which will yield finer grain, but one of the first questions should be about speed. After all, this is presumably one of the key reasons for using a fast film versus a slow film in the first place. Assuming you don't want to slow down your fast film, you already have a direction to go in - ie a fine grain developer that gives you good speed. Next, since 35mm fast film will show grain in any case, most people prefer reasonably good acutance/sharpness under average shooting conditions, rather than slightly finer but mushy looking grain. Also ask yourself what kind of tonality you are after - which has a lot to do with the kinds of subjects you photograph. Do you generally prefer higher contrast negatives, or do you need the longest tonal scale? What kinds of things do you photograph most? Do you want a lot of flexibility? How much control do you want? Etc.

    Combining the answers to these questions will usually point you in a clearer direction - and actually in most cases, as Thomas points out, the direction is usually toward a general purpose, commercially available solvent developer, rather than something more limiting (like divided D23 variants). These formulas are "balanced" to provide tonal flexibility, fine grain and good sharpness, without going too far in any particular direction. Each formula is different, but not tremendously different. With practice, you can then use the flexibility of these formulas to alter contrast, increase/decrease sharpness, increase/decrease graininess by varying exposure, developer dilution, development time, agitation, etc.

    With that it mind, if you're not happy with Rodinal's graininess, move to a general purpose solvent developer like XTOL (try it at 1+0 and 1+1), D-76 1+1 (or ID-11 1+1) or DDX. These will all give you at least slightly more speed and lower graininess than Rodinal, with lots of tonal flexibility, at the expense of a small amount of sharpness (Rodinal is not quite as sharp as most people think it is).

    Also, if you feel like you might want to experiment with a few different developers and want to be able to point yourself in certain directions based on the characteristics you are looking for, I'd strongly suggest reading something like The Film Developing Cookbook by Anchell/Troop. It is an excellent beginners' guide to the different categories of developers and their characteristics. Once you understand the general differences between say a solvent fine grain developer and an acutance developer, you'll be in a much better position to try things without going in circles of endless experimentation and/or testing. That will never lead to good results because no matter which film and developer you choose, you really need to work with it for a while if you want to make the most of it.

    Hope this helps.

  6. #36
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,233
    Images
    296
    Really good points, Michael. The idea of really learning how to use a developer, in order to get the most out of it, is paramount.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  7. #37
    baachitraka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bremen, Germany.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,325
    Thanks Michael. I will sort it out and find what fits for my taste, without sacrificing too much with fast films.
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin