Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,989   Posts: 1,524,086   Online: 1112
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 29
  1. #1
    cliveh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,131
    Images
    340

    Photographic Paper Size

    35mm with its 3:2 ratio is probably the most popular format of all time. So why have paper manufacturers not make paper to the same ratio?

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    591
    I understand that they did at one time but it didn't go over well. Which doesn't make any practical or aesthetic sense, since it is considered the golden ratio.
    Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Arts: Journalism - University of Arkansas 2014

    Canon A-1, Canon AE-1, Canon Canonet GIII 17, Argus 21, Rolleicord Va, Mamiya RB67, Voigtländer Bessa

    http://darkroom317.deviantart.com/

  3. #3
    Chris Lange's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    736
    Images
    32
    3:2 ≠ 1.618:1
    See my work at my website CHRISTOPHER LANGE PHOTOGRAPHY

    or my snaps at my blog MINIMUM DENSITY
    --
    If you don't have it, then you don't have it.

  4. #4
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,103
    Images
    60
    Quote Originally Posted by Darkroom317 View Post
    I understand that they did at one time but it didn't go over well. Which doesn't make any practical or aesthetic sense, since it is considered the golden ratio.
    The "Golden Ratio" (aka as the Golden Mean) is actually approximately 1:1.618 ..., not 1.5:1.

    Paper sizes are imbued with a lot of history, and vary with location - e.g. 12x16 is common in the UK.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,510
    They have and still do! Given the fact that the vast majority of 35mm work is snapshots, you've got
    4x6 and 5x7. Much bigger than that and you've got a sheet of fuzz.

  6. #6
    cliveh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,131
    Images
    340
    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    They have and still do! Given the fact that the vast majority of 35mm work is snapshots, you've got
    4x6 and 5x7. Much bigger than that and you've got a sheet of fuzz.
    5 X 7 is not a 3:2 ratio.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,510
    5x7 is close enough. Besides, the automated printers are using paper in rolls. Saunders once made
    an 8X10 easel with the frame cropped down to 35mm proportions. Seems silly to me, since most of
    us want to crop more precisely to whatever, not just to the fixed ratio.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    127
    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    5x7 is close enough. Besides, the automated printers are using paper in rolls. Saunders once made
    an 8X10 easel with the frame cropped down to 35mm proportions. Seems silly to me, since most of
    us want to crop more precisely to whatever, not just to the fixed ratio.
    Paper sizes have always been a bit messy. 5x7 is often not close enough to a 2:3 ratio which is why many pro labs and all modern automated printers like Frontiers and Noritsus can make 5x7.5 prints to get closer to that ratio. These machines can also make 6x9 prints instead of 6x8 which itself is an odd size derived from the old full plate 6.5x8.5 (I think Ilford still make full plate paper). The machines can also do 5.5x7 that is close to 4:5 ratio. To cap it all off, inkjet paper is largely made in office paper sizes like A4 and new sizes like A3+ have been introduced in that market. OzJohn

  9. #9
    mooseontheloose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Kyoto, Japan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,663
    Images
    36
    In France (Europe?) 7x9.5 is a common paper size (whereas 8x10 is not). I didn't use it much since it was more of a pain to use for contact prints, but it was a nice size to print 35mm full frame.
    Rachelle

    My favorite thing is to go where I've never been. D. Arbus

  10. #10
    Alan Klein's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    New Jersey, formerly NYC.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    426
    35mm with its 3:2 ratio is probably the most popular format of all time. So why have paper manufacturers not make paper to the same ratio?

    It's an evil plot to drive us nuts. The only answer is to shoot slides and project them.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin