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  1. #31
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    I maybe wrong here, but I always thought Rodinal was a high acutance developer, which would work better with films like HP5 as opposed to FP4. Also, surely still bath development will have a greater effect on micro contrast than developer formulation.
    Other way around acutance developers work better with slower finer grained films, they weren't recommended for fast films.

    Stand /still bath development accentuates edges effects but few realise the main proponents are shooting LF and ULF sheet film and not 35mm or 120.

    Ian

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    Other way around acutance developers work better with slower finer grained films, they weren't recommended for fast films.

    Stand /still bath development accentuates edges effects but few realise the main proponents are shooting LF and ULF sheet film and not 35mm or 120.

    Ian
    I don't doubt you are correct and thanks for the reply, but my statement comes from seeing some very impressive images developed in Rodinal from 400 ISO. However, perhaps I didn't see enough FP4 films developed in the same way.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  3. #33
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    I don't doubt you are correct and thanks for the reply, but my statement comes from seeing some very impressive images developed in Rodinal from 400 ISO. However, perhaps I didn't see enough FP4 films developed in the same way.
    Rodinal and APX100 or Tmax100 probably give the best overall balance of sharpness and definition, very fine grain and a good tonal range, HP5 or Tri-X won't get that close but they have their own characteristics.

    IAn

  4. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    Other way around acutance developers work better with slower finer grained films, they weren't recommended for fast films.

    Stand /still bath development accentuates edges effects but few realise the main proponents are shooting LF and ULF sheet film and not 35mm or 120.

    Ian
    In the past, there were quite some 'rules'like these. And, they still apply, but for the older lenses, lacking detail. Beginning with certain 4x5" optics, detailed images became available. And this is not a theoretical approach; most of our information stems from the details. After all, the photographic firms had a good reason to develop those optics! But the lenses with other properties, makes us to change our development procedures and film choices. It is not difficult to see that an edge effect has a completely differnt effect on details or on large forms. And a HD image is very different from a low definition image. Course grain differs from fine grain. And even grain size may vary, depending on the shape of the grain.
    The modification of development procedures is best done, using MTF, but that is not the favorite of many APUG members. I think a practical approuch is to look at other photographs, made under similar optical conditions you are using, or make a few comparisons yourself.

    Jed
    Last edited by Jed Freudenthal; 05-26-2012 at 03:52 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #35

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    It occurs to me that there are three components to the microcontrast game. One is how rapidly the image changes from black to white, or or vice versa, when there is a sharp step in the exposure. A second is the "ears" you see in PE's example - the additional density at the edge. The third is if there is any lightening on the white edge of the step compared to the average lighter density. Developer composition, dilution, and agitation can effect all of these differently and thereby produce different visual effects.

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