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Thread: Infrared 101?

  1. #1
    yeknom02's Avatar
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    Infrared 101?

    Here's what I have:

    IR Filter: B+W "092" filter (89B/R72).
    Film: Efke IR 820 Aura (2 rolls), Konica 750nm (1 roll).
    Camera: either Nikon FE2 or Konica Auto S2.
    Meter: either the camera's internal meter (covered by the IR filter) or a Gossen Luna-Pro F.

    If I want to keep bracketing to a minimum (hey, film is expensive), then how should I go about shooting with this setup?
    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST
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    The meters in your cameras do not see infrared light. The amount of infrared light varies. So it is best to bracket.

    Sorry, I don't have a better answer

    Howard Dvorin

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    Brian C. Miller's Avatar
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    You will get an EI of something like 3, 6, or 12. You will have to bracket a bit to find out what your development times will be based on how you want the film to develop. But after you establish your own EI you probably won't loose too many shots if you don't bracket.

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    Maris's Avatar
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    The ratio of infrared to visible light is variable so the E.I. you set on your visible-light meter can vary too.

    I haven't shot Efke IR820 behind a IR720 filter in the 35mm format but have exposed maybe a hundred rolls of 120 and maybe a hundred sheets of 4x5 and 8x10. Connecting what I saw, what I did, and what I got, the E.I. values that work for me are:

    Front-lit sunny day subjects: E.I. = 1.5
    Back-lit sunny day subjects: E.I. = 1.0
    Open shade: E.I. = 1.0
    Overcast, stormy, dramatic: E.I. = 0.5 maybe 0.25

    The good thing about infrared is that there is no blame if you didn't get what you expected. You can't previsualise what you can't see. Something weird/wonderful usually turns up.
    Photography, the word itself, invented and defined by its author Sir John.F.W.Herschel, 14 March 1839 at the Royal Society, Somerset House, London. Quote "...Photography or the application of the Chemical rays of light to the purpose of pictorial representation,..". unquote.

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    wildbill's Avatar
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    two very different films.
    1/4@16 for the konica in full sun, just trust me I've shot tons of it with that filter
    1 sec @16 for the efke.
    google the shit out of it.
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

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    Hi. I have had good results using the Efke IR 820 film. I used the same Gossen meter as you have set to 4.5ASA. I originally bracketed one stop above and below 6ASA which meant that I got 12 shots to a roll. From this I concluded that 4.5ASA worked best. The camera used was a Nikon FE. The filter was the Hoya R72 and my general technique was to use incident readings. I would, however, recommend bracketing as others seem to use a lower speed for this film. I would also advise you to wait until there is plenty of sunshine as you are more likely to get usable negatives when there is plenty of IR around.

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    paul_c5x4's Avatar
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    If you are bracketing, I'd suggest 1.5 to 2 stops either side rather than just one stop. Just processed a few sheets of IR820 that I had shot with a one stop difference and there is very little change in density.

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    wildbill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paul_c5x4 View Post
    If you are bracketing, I'd suggest 1.5 to 2 stops either side rather than just one stop. Just processed a few sheets of IR820 that I had shot with a one stop difference and there is very little change in density.
    correct indeed.
    that's why I always say bracketing is for sissies. I use a light meter instead. HA!
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  9. #9
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildbill View Post
    correct indeed.
    that's why I always say bracketing is for sissies. I use a light meter instead. HA!
    For infrared? You have a meter that reads infrared? Or was that a joke?

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    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
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    Semi hijacking this thread.

    I got a b+w 099 filter coming in. It's orange in color. I have used orange filters and do routinely.

    There are no posted filter factors for this filter at all. Anyone happen to know?

    Id like to use it with regular panchromatic films (im guessing it will work just like an orange filter) as well as HIE.

    Filter factors or ei ballpark would be nice, I'd rather not burn precious film bracketing or shooting an entire roll for tests.

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