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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Prunier View Post
    There could be a bad reaction from using aluminium. I know if you use it in cooking, certain ingredients are effected and change color etc. The same ingredients wouldn't change if using stainless steel. The coffee that I use had been using plastic and has now switched to a metal lined cans. I was thinking the same thing as you. Then I remembered my days as a Chef!
    Mostly I use 16x20 stainless trays in an eight foot stainless sink. Two of those is a lot of fixer, so I stack them and put a lid on the top one for storage. Normally I use the darkroom several times a week, but last fall I went three months without printing. When I opened up the ss trays they were a mess of stain and corrosion. Even stainless can be a bad place to store some photo chemicals.

    John Powers
    "If you want to be famous, you must do something more badly than anybody in the entire world." Miroslav Tichı

  2. #12
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    AISI 304 stainless steel (typically used in stainless kitchen sinks) is recommended only for short temporary contact with most photochemicals. Some products sold as "stainless steel" may be even worse.

    AISI 316 is the way to go for longer contact, and even that is not perfect. Titanium works if it has to be metal, but it is quite expensive. There are also some highly corrosion resistant nickel alloys (Hastelloy) that work for long-time contact.

    Not all plastics are good, either. Polyethylene (PE) can sustain practically all photochemistry very well for long times, but it has some air permeability. PET should be preferred for long-term storage of air-sensitive chemicals such as developer, although PET may be degraded by some chemicals.

  3. #13
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    You want to store your chemicals in a light resistant non-reactive vessel. Glass, and HDPE is good.

  4. #14
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    It doesn't have to be light resistant unless stored in direct sunlight or really strong illumination for long times.

    HDPE is widely used but has some permeability to air. It is good but not perfect.

  5. #15

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    HDPE is considered poor for developers but good for other solutions. Best for developers is PET and PVC.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  6. #16
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    I'm stating this over and over again but here it comes again:

    Store your developers in used PET beverage bottles. Wash well before using, and mark well to avoid any accidental consumption...

    The key point here is a really airtight cap and a possibility to squeeze the bottle so that all the air comes out. Then, tighten the cap to keep the bottle in the squeezed form.

    Using transparent bottles allows you to easily evaluate for any discoloration or gunk in solution without pouring it out. Just don't store in direct sunlight or near a window. A cool place is better than warm. It would be best to have a refrigerator for chemicals, set at about 10-15 deg C to slow down any reactions without having a risk of precipitation that might happen with some photochemistry if you are at a typical refrigerator temperature of around 4 deg C.

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