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  1. #11
    mts
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    I have to sponge both B&W and color films owing to the low ambient humidity typically 5-10% in New Mexico. Residual photo-flo does not drain before it dries leaving terrible water spots. The problem is much worse for sheet film and 120 owing to the larger surface area. Removing remaining drops with a gentle wipe solves the problem.
    By denying the facts, any paradox can be sustained--Galileo

  2. #12
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mts View Post
    I have to sponge both B&W and color films owing to the low ambient humidity typically 5-10% in New Mexico. Residual photo-flo does not drain before it dries leaving terrible water spots. The problem is much worse for sheet film and 120 owing to the larger surface area. Removing remaining drops with a gentle wipe solves the problem.
    I have exactly the same problem in Minnesota in the the winter. Due to the cold it is bone dry in the air, and my film dries extremely quickly.

    While I don't use a sponge, I have to use an extremely soft rubber edge to remove excess wetting agent. I have found Kodak, Ilford, and Fuji films safe for this practice, but Foma, Efke, and Lucky (the only others I've tried) have gotten microscopic scratches which show in the prints. If I do not use the supple rubber edge to remove the excess, my film is full of mineral deposits and marks which I have subsequently been unable to remove after the emulsion is dry.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  3. #13
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    do you use a presoak?
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  4. #14

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    No presoak.

  5. #15
    PDH
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    Phoenix has really hard water as well and I used distilled for the wetting agent and still got water marks. I now wash using tap water filtered though an inline filter, then rinse in deionized water, then distilled water with wetting agent. I dont know how much of the minerals the inline filter removes but it appears to help.

  6. #16
    ath
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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    I would never use a squeegee and can't understand why they were ever suggested for photography.
    I would never hang up a film for drying unless having it "squeegeed" before with a piece of fresh paper kitchen towel.
    Hundreds of films later - I can't understand why people have water marks.
    YMMV
    Regards,
    Andreas

  7. #17
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    I have exactly the same problem in Minnesota in the the winter. Due to the cold it is bone dry in the air, and my film dries extremely quickly.

    While I don't use a sponge, I have to use an extremely soft rubber edge to remove excess wetting agent. I have found Kodak, Ilford, and Fuji films safe for this practice, but Foma, Efke, and Lucky (the only others I've tried) have gotten microscopic scratches which show in the prints. If I do not use the supple rubber edge to remove the excess, my film is full of mineral deposits and marks which I have subsequently been unable to remove after the emulsion is dry.
    I should add that in 99% of my prints, since I have started doing this, I get maximum two or three spots in my prints, even in 16x20 from 35mm. They are squeaky clean, which works out great for me, because I HATE spotting prints, with a real passion.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  8. #18

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    Ah, welcome to the club!

    There's nothing I haven't tried yet to get rid of those. At best, I am able to minimize the incidence--say, a frame or two lost per roll of thirty-six. Best results: everything tap, then a vigorous one-minute rinse in distilled, pour out, 15-second rinse in PhotoFlo at about 1+4000 (a few drops per half-gallon), vigorous dog-shake before hanging (vertically). If you're hanging them in the bathroom, make sure your taps don't leak as this will spray tiny droplets (mineralized!) all around the place.

    Keep posting, folks. Always ready to try out new ideas.

    Best of luck fighting this scourge!

    PS. I always suspected hanging diagonally might work--just never got around the topology and the hardware required.

  9. #19

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    Can these be got rid of by re-washing with proper technique, or are they permanent?

  10. #20
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    Yeah, the one on the wall to the guy's left is definitely a water spot. I really don't see any in the motel shot, but maybe I'm not looking closely enough.

    Wash with a good hypo clearing agent like PermaWash, following the directions. It only takes a couple of minutes to completely remove the fixer, not an hour.

    I've never used Ilfotol, so I'm not familiar with it. I've used PhotoFlo for over 50 years, and never had any water spotting problems in thousands of rolls.
    PhotoFlo is just soap. It reduces the surface tension of the water so it drains off rather than beading up.

    - Leigh
    “Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something.” - Plato

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