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  1. #1

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    Diagnose this problem

    Some of the negatives have this weird pattern on them - in the sky, and on the wall next to the guy sitting. This is the first time I've noticed it after processing around 10-12 rolls, and am assuming it has to do with my processing. It is more prevalent on other images on this roll, but these are the only ones I have handy. Most of the images turned out OK, and others not so much. I'm hoping to correct whatever I did wrong so that it doesn't happen again. Thanks.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 20120526r01f030_Edit.jpg   20120524r01f023_Edit.jpg  

  2. #2

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    Looks like water spots.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  3. #3

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    that looks like water spots to me...Texas is known for hard water. Did you use tap water?

  4. #4

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    I use distilled water for the developer, stop, and fix. I then wash my double reel tank with tap (inversion cycles 5,10,15,20,15) then the last two with distilled water and Ilfotol - 10 then 5. Then I vigorously shake reels individually over my tub, unreel, and hang. I never had a problem on my first 8-10 rolls doing it this way. I wonder what changed? Any ideas on a better way to wash the film?

  5. #5

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    Try a more dilute solution of the wetting agent (Ilfotol). When I use Kodak Photo Flo I normally use it diluted at 1:400 instead of 1:200. Works well and no water spots. I also use distilled water to make up my final rinse.

  6. #6
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Those are water marks, regardless of the technique you used to hang your rolls.

    Have you ever tried hanging your film diagonally? Water droplets left on the film have a much shorter distance to travel until they reach an edge, where they can safely dry out without causing water marks in the image area.

    Also, remove your film from the reels, and see-saw it through the wetting agent in an open container. This way your film is very evenly coated with the wetting agent before you hang it to dry.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  7. #7

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    Good suggestions.

  8. #8
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Using distilled water just before drying should prevent water maks (calcium deposits formed on the shiney side of film). Easy to remove though - lay your neg strips on your negative storage page shiney side up, breathe on them as though you are misting up a mirror and then gently rub them with a soft lens cleaning cloth (never try and wipe the emulsion side). If they still persist, dab a little ethanol on the cloth and wipe again.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  9. #9
    smieglitz's Avatar
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    I use a sponge film squeegee like the one made by Yankee to eliminate this problem. I always check the sponge to make sure it has no small particles of anything on it after dunking it in the tank full of Photo-Flo. (I assume Ilfotol is the Ilford equivalent of Photo-Flo.) Squeeze all the solution from the sponge and with only enough pressure to contact the film evenly, and draw the squeegee down the film one time. The key is to use a gentle touch and have the squeegee damp with the wetting agent, not water. I should mention that the film on the reel has been submerged for about 30 seconds in Photo-Flo mixed with distilled water previous to using the squeegee. It also helps to draw the squeegee upwards on the end where the film is being held, pat your fingers dry at that point and grab the film where you've just squeegeed, then run the sponge down the film. Otherwise, pinching the wet film at the end to hold it may let a water drop follow the sponge down the film and form a spot as it dries.

    I never have spots or scratches using this procedure although I have seen many students scratch their film by being heavy-handed with the squeegee or if using a hard rubber squeegee.

    With sheet film I forego squeegeeing, hang the film, and use paper towel along the edge and/or corner of the negative to wick off the wetting agent.

  10. #10
    cliveh's Avatar
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    I would never use a squeegee and can't understand why they were ever suggested for photography.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

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