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  1. #11

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    Obviously, you are still trying to learn (and we all are...) and your experience is very limited at this time. Why don't you keep this simple?

    Pickup some Tmax400 or Tri-X400. Set your camera to ISO1600 and shoot. You'll be developing a little longer than usual. How much longer depends on what developer you are using. If you tell us that, we can point you to an information you need.

    You can do some amazing things with these "basic" films....
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    Obviously, you are still trying to learn (and we all are...) and your experience is very limited at this time. Why don't you keep this simple?

    Pickup some Tmax400 or Tri-X400. Set your camera to ISO1600 and shoot. You'll be developing a little longer than usual. How much longer depends on what developer you are using. If you tell us that, we can point you to an information you need.

    You can do some amazing things with these "basic" films....
    Very limited. I've developed one roll of B&W and shot maybe 6ish? I'm using D-76 for a developer.
    Thanks,
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    Kenton Brede
    http://kentonbrede.com/

  3. #13

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    Cool.

    Say you have Tmax400. Say you are using D-76 at stock. Say your developer is at 20C/68F.
    If you shoot this film with your camera set at ISO 400, you'd develop it for 8 minutes.
    If you shoot this film with your camera set at ISO 1600, you'd develop it for 10 1/2 minutes.

    Rest of the process stays the same.

    I've done something like this with Tmax400, Tri-X, and Delta3200 all shot at the same scene. They were all very good.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  4. #14
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    First things first.

    Your subjects will be moving pretty quick so you'll want to keep the shutter speed up, say 1/125 or 1/250.

    F/1.7 is going to make nailing focus "interesting", it's not impossible, but it isn't easy. If you can get up to 2.8 or 4 you'll probably get more keepers.

    If those thoughts make sense then the only variable left is the ISO/EI. My guess is that you will need to get up around 3200 or even 6400.

    My suggestion is to shoot on manual and set the camera once and shoot.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  5. #15
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    Make sure you shoot at the same ISO the whole roll. And develop the film to THAT ISO, mark it down.
    - Derek
    [ Insert meaningless camera listing here ]

  6. #16

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    If you can find it, Neopan 1600, they discontinued it right before I bought my last brick for my brother's wedding. The grain is top notch and actually doesn't look too bad.

    Be sure to be in full manual mode no camera in the world knows what to do in a dark church room. I was doing 1/60th at f4 and lower on many of my 1600's, there's a few in the gallery.
    5x7 Eastman-Kodak kit / B&L 135mm Zeiss Tessar + Compur Deckel
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    RB67 Pro S /50 4.5 / 90 3.8 / 180 4.5 / WLF / prism finder / polaback
    Random 35mm stuff

  7. #17

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    Thanks for all the tips everyone! I've learned a lot in this thread. I ended up with Tri-x 400. 400 is the fastest film my camera shop has. It made for an easy choice. Tomorrow I'll see what the light is like. I'm going to take a light meter with me. I saw a couple shots online where someone pushed Tri-x to 3200 with D-76. If I have to I'll try it.
    Thanks again,
    --
    Kenton Brede
    http://kentonbrede.com/

  8. #18
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    I would try some shots with 1/30" or so. You take the picture when the couple/person nearest you is in "pause": imagine a pendulum swing, there is a moment when the movement stops before swinging the other way, by the same token you try to get the moment when the movement is reduced or stopped, as it can happen in tango, in certain waltzes etc. Couples in the background will be motion-blurred which will make an interesting background.

    Pay special attention to the head. You want the heads to be "acceptably" sharp, so try to catch the moment in which the heads move less. If, that moment, the legs or the arms move more and come out blurred, the image will actually "gain" in effect.

    You will not have light enough to freeze movement so just try to exploit the inevitable motion blurs in an aesthetically valid way.

    Good luck!

    Fabrizio
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  9. #19
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    If you use manual exposure, you can meter at 1600 and then manually open up a stop.
    Matt certainly means that if you set the camera at 1600 ISO but want to use it at 3200 ISO, i.e. at a higher speed, you meter at 1600 and then manually close a stop.

    I don't want to be pedantic but a marriage is a marriage and you could screw the work if you apply the correction the wrong way.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Diapositivo View Post
    Matt certainly means that if you set the camera at 1600 ISO but want to use it at 3200 ISO, i.e. at a higher speed, you meter at 1600 and then manually close a stop.

    I don't want to be pedantic but a marriage is a marriage and you could screw the work if you apply the correction the wrong way.
    Oops

    Matt certainly does mean that!
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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