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Thread: Frozen Film?

  1. #1

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    Frozen Film?

    I've seen some folks here mention that they keep film in the freezer.

    I take it that's to keep the film from aging as rapidly as it would otherwise?

    Also, are there films that really should (and conversely, should not) be put in the freezer to keep them fresh?

    In particular I'm thinking of Ilford PanF+ asa50. I've had great luck with it and would hate to see it go away given Ilford's problems.

    I'll also want to buy a fair chunk of 9 x 12 cm film once it comes back on the market. Into the freezer with it, too?

    Thanks!

  2. #2

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    Good Evening, Zenrhino,

    I've never heard of a film which couldn't be frozen. (But don't be surprised if someone out there pops up with an example!) Generally, slow and medium speed films keep a looooong time if frozen; fast films benefit also, but perhaps to a slightly lesser degree. With most black and white films, think in decades beyond the nominal expiration date. Kodak has long recommended that its "professional" color films be refrigerated or frozen until use, but "amateur" films, color included, can also benefit.

    Give any frozen film plenty of time to reach room temperature before unsealing the packaging, just to avoid condensation. You probably won't have any problem with using part of a box of sheet film or part of a bulk roll and then putting it back in the freezer, but, again, exercise a normal caution about condensation; moving a partially used and resealed package from a humid 95 degree environment to the freezer might cause problems, although I've never actually encountered anyone who can cite an example.

    Konical

  3. #3
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    The only films not recommended for the freezer is the polaroid type films, I have kept my film in the freezer for years beyond the exp date with no degration of the film, essentually when you freeze it, you have stopped the aging process, and it works with essentually any type of film except again the polaroid type films, I have some B&W sheet film that I shoot every once in a while that expired in 1975 and it still shoots great.

    Dave Parker
    Ground Glass Specialties

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    rogueish's Avatar
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    You can also freeze your printing paper. B&W anyway, the colour printers here will tell if colour paper can be frozen, but I don't see why not. Don't freeze Polaroid film. Although after all the film I have stuffed into mine, there no room for food, let alone paper. When I buy film it goes into the freezer, the oldest film get pulled into the fridge, and the oldest in the fridge gets put into the camera case. Rotate your stock.
    Letting it reach room temp before using is important. I got a bunch of Kodak colour 120 film at a $1 a roll than had expired back in 92. I pull a couple rolls out every fall, still works good.

  5. #5

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    Along with Efke 127 R17 and Vericrome Pan, I still use 30 year+ old Efke that my was twist wrapped in aluminium foil back then and was found in a corner store toffee bin because they thought it was candy

    Mark
    Mark Layne
    Nova Scotia
    and Barbados

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Konical
    Give any frozen film plenty of time to reach room temperature before unsealing the packaging, just to avoid condensation.

    Konical
    That advice can't be emphasised enough. If the film is still cold when you use it it will condense water from the air and you will get a misty surface, thus giving a soft focus effect. If it is colder still, it might snap. Whenever possible I tend to take film out of the freezer the day before I use it.

    David.

  7. #7
    Monophoto's Avatar
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    I recall hearing a presentation by a representative from Polaroid who had been involved in some film testing in Polaroid's laboratory. He said that Polaroid's testing of CONVENTIONAL films indicated that freezing in fact retarded, if not completely supressed, the natural aging process of film. Therefore, he concluded that stocking up and freezing film does make sense.

    However, he also noted that when frozen film thaws, the aging process resumes - and that Polaroid's testing showed that it actually accelerated. His conclusion was that film that had been frozen and thawed should be used and processed as quickly as possible.

    Several other responses commented on the issues involved in thawing frozen film - that it most thaw completely, and that this takes several hours (I have always allowed overnight), and that the film packaging should not be opened until after the film fully thaws in order to avoid condensation on the surface of the film.

  8. #8
    BWGirl's Avatar
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    I love that Pan F film, too! Isn't it wow???!!! I have about 4 rolls of it sitting in my freezer at this very moment...along with a few other things... like Acros and FP4.

    I have never had a problem keeping it there, but....and you might have heard this before.... thaw well before using!
    Jeanette
    .................................................. ................
    Isaiah 25:1

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by BWGirl
    I love that Pan F film, too! Isn't it wow???!!! I have about 4 rolls of it sitting in my freezer at this very moment...along with a few other things... like Acros and FP4.
    To be perfectly honest, I started using it because I got two 100 ft rolls of it on ebay for $10 each a month out of date. But man, does it ever turn out FUN stuff.

    http://bigwhitecoolbreeze.com/dailyp...2904/park1.jpg

    developed in ilfosol.

    what other slow films do you like?



 

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