Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,504   Posts: 1,543,470   Online: 960
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 25
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    192

    Evaluating negatives: after development/stop?

    If you want to do a quick evaluation of a negative, when can you expose it to light? After development/stop? When I want to check purely for light leaks/lens sharpness, I don't feel like going through the whole ritual.

  2. #2
    Bill Burk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    3,275
    Images
    46
    If you use an alkaline fix, you should process fully including fixation.

    There's plenty of threads discussing the possibility of further development in that case - and if you were looking for light leak symptoms you might get a confusing test result.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    192
    Got it, so in otherwords: no shortcuts.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Oregon and Austria
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    835
    You can turn on the white light after half the time in the fix (assuming you've done a clip test and the film clearing time has been established). I always wait a bit longer for "real" negatives, but for a test, you should be okay.

    Best,

    Doremus

    www.DoremusScudder.com

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southern USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,824
    It would be very difficult to evaluate an unfixed negative. You are talking about saving 5 minutes. Since you don't want to go thru the whole ritual, have you considered digital photography instead.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  6. #6
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Central florida,USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,533
    Images
    1
    i never expose a film to lightbefore the 1st fixin bath...too risky!
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  7. #7
    cliveh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,300
    Images
    343
    If you are that keen to view your negs prior to fixation, why not develop with occasional inspection to a dark green safelight, assuming we are talking black & white panchromatic.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  8. #8
    Maris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Noosa, Queensland, Australia.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    729
    I do this with 8x10 black and white negatives to freak out darkroom visitors: turn on the tungsten lights after the neg has been in well agitated acid stop for 30 seconds. So far I've never had fogging even with several minutes looking and I've checked and double checked. Constraints include good stop bath, no extended inspection under fluorescent lights, and no sunlight.

    By the way, a developed but unfixed neg is a strange looking thing and using it as a guide for subtle effects is pretty dubious.
    Photography, the word itself, invented and defined by its author Sir John.F.W.Herschel, 14 March 1839 at the Royal Society, Somerset House, London. Quote "...Photography or the application of the Chemical rays of light to the purpose of pictorial representation,..". unquote.

  9. #9
    Bill Burk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    3,275
    Images
    46
    1st Generation IR devices are very much more affordable than they were 30 years ago.

    Developing negatives and watching them emerge is as much fun as watching prints emerge.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Daventry, Northamptonshire, England
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    6,961
    The post by maris has set me thinking. I know he is clearly saying that exposure after a rigorous stop has been fine but I think that this means that the stop has done something that is irreversible i.e. if for instance the neg hasn't been developed enough there can be no question of pouring the dev back in and carrying the development further.

    If I have got this right then what is the irreversible chemical action that prevents further development? Presumably if water stop has the same effect of stopping development then presumably this too is irreversible. So is this the same irreversible chemical action by water as by acid stop and if so what is it that prevents further development after a water stop but has no effect on development when water is simply a pre-wash?

    Thanks

    pentaxuser

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin