Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 76,239   Posts: 1,680,011   Online: 1011
      
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 32
  1. #11
    Diapositivo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Rome, Italy
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,844
    Our natural vision is in colour. My "normal" way of imagining a composition is when colour is an integral part of it. Actually this is already a statement that suggests an overthinking which isn't there. Colour is your normal environment. Colour photography is a description of your environment. It's less "compositionally involved" than B&W so to speak.

    A subject works better in B&W rather than in colour when you want to stress shape, contrast, geometrical relations between the elements of the compositions, perspective, whatever. A subject works in B&W when it has a "graphic" quality.

    With B&W you stress those elements of the composition (shape, geometries, lines, shadows, contrast), and your composition works just because you stress those elements. By taking away colour, the rest of whatever makes an image is more "stressed" than it would be with colour.

    So B&W is, in a sense, more "abstract" than colour because with colour you take a portrait of a certain portion of reality as it is, while with B&W you use what you see in front of you to make a composition where geometry, shape, lines, contrast, shadows etc. create the picture "regardless" so to exaggerately speak of the real subject of your pictures.

    So my advise is: think less "photographically". Look around you. Get an interest in "things". When shooting colour, composition is merely a way to better describe the "thing". Your subject is the subject, not the various games played by geometries, lines, shades, "pendants" etc.

    The railing of a gate could make an interesting subject for B&W (for pattern, repetition, perspective, contrast, games of light) and a boring subject in colour because colour stresses more "the railing" rather than the patterns and the viewer sees a boring railing rather than a "composition".

    So in order to take good colour pictures you have to dismiss your "professional deformation" and stop thinking in terms of patterns, repetitions, perspective, contrast, correlations, pendants, shadows and just assume an attitude of mere "description" of the object you want to portray, for which you have to have and portray an interest which goes beyond the abovementioned composition elements.

    My 0.02 Euro

    PS I only use colour. My "avatar" is in B&W because it's a case where B&W works better than colour.
    Last edited by Diapositivo; 06-13-2012 at 03:48 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    623
    Depends what you're shooting I think. If you're shooting city/urban street scenes. A colour photo can look like just another photo of a dude walking to work. In B&W it's "street photography" and you'll win awards. Shoot colourful nature scenes, and unless you're Ansel Adams, I think colour looks best. Nature has some amazing colours, like the blue of the sea etc. Seems a shame not to capture it.

    If you like B&W though, keep going with it, you don't need to make a lifetime choice, if you feel like colour one day, go for it.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Switzerland
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    376
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    28
    I don't think I've ever shot a decent colour photograph. I just do it for fun and leave the serious work to B&W.
    And the sign said, "long haired freaky people need not apply"

  4. #14
    John Austin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southern Forest Region, Western Australia
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    521
    Blog Entries
    3
    These replies are to damned sensible

  5. #15
    Klainmeister's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Santa Fe, NM
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,493
    Images
    30
    I agree John. Let's try to get his ball rolling.

    BW is the best, no matter what. Digital has saturated (literally and figuratively) the color scene so much, I couldn't imagine the purpose of shooting color film!



    ...there, that should get some cats hissing
    K.S. Klain

  6. #16
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    In a darkroom far, far away...
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    7,115
    Blog Entries
    30
    Images
    19
    All of my comments can be found above. But I would like to add a personal note. I have found that seldom does color attract me when looking for subject matter. Most times I have trained my 'vision' to respond to busy-ness. I mean that when I am photographing I am attracted to lines and form and contrast and patterns. Not often do I catch myself wrenching around because a vivid hue caught my fancy.

    That to say this. A lot of it has to do with personal experiences and preferences. A good photographer can draw on his/her past and capture a wonderful photograph, regardless of medium or color/BW and whatnot. A great photographer knows when to use which tool to visually and emotionally convey a story or message and can do so with facilily.
    Thank you.
    -CW

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  7. #17
    Dave Krueger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Huntsville, Alabama
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    394
    I'm like Stephen Colbert. I don't see color.

  8. #18
    Old-N-Feeble's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    My wife gives me hell when you leave the toilet seat up... so STOP leaving the toilet seat up!!
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,545
    Dave / Stephen... I've always been curious and I hope you don't mind me asking this. For those who are completely color blind, or nearly so, can you look through deeply color filters and see the way panchromatic films such as TMX 100 will render an image with the same filter?

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    5,260
    Images
    9
    Are you at all color blind? Might be a factor. It is for me. But I like shooting color especially with saturated films. With saturated films I can see most of the colors I did not see in the scene.

    I see from reading that someone already mentioned the color blind thing.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  10. #20
    Brian C. Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Everett, WA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    495
    Blog Entries
    2
    Images
    13
    Quote Originally Posted by Markok765 View Post
    ... I can't for the life of me shoot a good colour photo. All the while I can take good BWs all day long. ...
    Yes, it's true, you were meant for black and white. And then you got stuck in a color world. Ah, what cruel fates bestow upon us our fortune! I think the fates tend to be a bunch of jerks.

    Seriously, though, you've been training your eye for black and white. Spend some time looking at color photographs you like. Think about why you like them, and then try to find things that match that criteria.

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin