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  1. #11
    Chrismat's Avatar
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    Try Rollei Retro 80s, it has an extended red sensitivity. It's like shooting with a light orange filter without using any filter.

  2. #12
    Athiril's Avatar
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    Delta 400 has similar spectral sensitivity to Fomapan 400, both into far red with a sharp drop off. Only Delta 400 and 3200 have this from Ilford.

    Fomapan 400 has over double the red sensitivity it does than blue sensitivity on the low end, and almost triple the far red sensitivity than blue (Fomapan 400 peaks about 690 and drops off sharply to almost nothing at 700), only 400 has that, 200 does in sheet sizes only iirc. Looks similar to FP4+ but over a longer sensitivity scale.

    Delta 400 is much more even, equal sensitivity across the board, peak is about 670 before dropping off smoother to nothing at 700.

  3. #13
    David Allen's Avatar
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    When I used to do traditional large format photography with FP4, etc I always used a minus blue filter.

    Since switching (many years ago) to Delta 400 processed in two-bath developer I have not found any need to use filters. This film and developer combination gives great clouds and very good tonal separation.

    If you go to my website, click on the 'Galleries' button and then on Portfolio called 'Berlin Prenzlauer Berg II" and click through to view images 4, 9 & 10 you can see the kind of clouds that the film produces with no filtration and no manipulation at the printing stage (other than a slight burn-in in the direction of the sun because of the difference in density caused by using a wide-angle lens).

    Best,

    David
    www.dsallen.de

  4. #14
    BobD's Avatar
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    Many first generation AF point & shoot cameras have filter mounting threads and are very inexpensive these days. Example: the Nikon L35AF

  5. #15

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    The only way to really settle this question is to look at the spectral sensitivity curves for each of the films. However, from my own experience I would say that no BW film really produces a good representation of clouds. Regardless of any claims to panchromatic sensitization, films all have an increased blue sensitivity by their very nature. You really need to use a filter.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    You can cut a gel filter to size and tape it across the film gate inside the camera. .
    I have done this very effectively to use tungsten movie stock in point and shoot cameras, using an 85A orange gel filter.

  7. #17
    IloveTLRs's Avatar
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    I've had excellent results with Ilford Pan F+ 50, especially in Rodinal

    This was with an XA2
    Those who know, shoot film

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